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Common Brevetoxin Metabolite Found in Gulf of Mexico Oysters May Not be a Health Risk

Brevetoxin B2—an abundant shellfish metabolite of brevetoxin found in Gulf of Mexico oysters—does not readily pass through an intestinal barrier, rendering it unlikely to cause neurotoxic shellfish poisoning. The B2 metabolite is produced by oysters and many other animals by attaching the amino acid cysteine to the brevetoxin that is consumed by shellfish during blooms […]

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NCCOS Helps Colombia Develop Eco-friendly Aquaculture Plan For Caribbean MPA

Commercial and artisanal fishermen of the Colombian islands of the San Andres archipelago were directly affected by the recent International Court of Justice ruling that shifted maritime borders between Colombia and Nicaragua, cutting off access to traditional fishing grounds. As a result, a new effort to develop ecologically responsible aquaculture on the islands is underway, […]

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NCCOS Expertise Used to Help “Bring Shipwrecks to Life” for Future Citizen Scientists

On August 13–14, SCUBA divers, historians, and scientists gathered at the North Carolina Aquarium in Pine Knoll Shores, NC to learn how to identify fish, algae, and invertebrates common to the coastal waters of the South Atlantic states. The workshop was part of NOAA’s “Bringing Shipwrecks to Life” program, which is designed to connect local […]

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Integrating Processes Controlling the South Florida Coastal Marine Ecosystem

NCCOS is developing a workable, ecosystem-based management approach to address the complex and inter-linked marine-estuarine-terrestrial environment in south Florida. Building on traditional Integrated Conceptual Ecosystem Models, the NCCOS-sponsored research project Marine and Estuarine Goal Setting for South Florida (MARES) is developing new models that incorporate positive ecosystem services instead of only negative ecosystem impacts (i.e., […]

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Research Shows Shellfish Metabolism of Red Tide Toxin Can Change the Outcome of Poisoning

As recent as 2012, the State of Texas was impacted by the longest red tide on record, leading to the collapse of its oyster industry and  the Governor to seek disaster assistance from the U. S. Department of Commerce. A new study published in the American Chemical Society journal: Chemical Research in Toxicology shows that in animals the […]

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NOAA Partners with Native Alaskans to Assess Seafood Safety

The National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) issued a report on the health of two species of salmon and shellfish commonly used for subsistence by three Native Alaskan tribes. The “Assessment of contaminant body burdens and histopathology of fish and shellfish species frequently used for subsistence food by Alaska Native communities”  was requested by several Native Alaskan tribes […]

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NOAA Scientists: Fish Spawning Hotspots Located by New Technology

Scientists at the Caribbean Coral Reef Institute at the University of Puerto Rico identified locations and size of reef fish spawning aggregations by the sounds they make.  The success of many commercially valuable species in the Caribbean requires annual spawning aggregations of reef fishes; aggregation behavior creates extreme vulnerability to overfishing. The scientists developed a […]

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All You Can Eat: usoceangov NOAA Ocean Today kiosk video

Watch as hunters become the hunted in this story of a delicious but damaging invasive predator and efforts to remove them from our fragile reefs.  Lionfish released in U.S. waters are ruining these critical resources by eating fish and shellfish that are valuable to you and me, as well as the reefs they live on. […]

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