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Red Tide Toxin Metabolite Accumulates in Organs, May Pose Greater Risk to Shellfish Consumers

In 2012, the state of Texas experienced the longest red tide on record, leading to a collapse of its oyster industry. Red tides in the Gulf of Mexico affect humans, wildlife, fisheries, and the regional tourist-related economy. They are caused by the harmful algae Karenia brevis, which release a neurotoxin called brevetoxin that accumulates in exposed shellfish and […]

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The National Coral Reef Monitoring Program begins “Puerto Rico” Phase

This summer, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) researchers began collecting data on coral reefs around the island of Puerto Rico to help local natural resource managers address coral reef management concerns as part of the National Coral Reef Monitoring Program’s “Puerto Rico phase.” This program collects standardized biological, physical, and socioeconomic monitoring data […]

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MARES Project Furthers Ecosystem Based Management of South Florida Regions

The Marine and Estuarine Goal Setting for South Florida (MARES) Project, sponsored by NCCOS, increases awareness of and appreciation for the value of coastal marine ecosystems and their impacts upon human society. Over 50 MARES researchers (both natural and social scientists), managers, and stakeholders collaborated to understand and document cause and effect relationships along with the societal benefits […]

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Study Describes Social-ecological System of La Parguera, Puerto Rico

A new study describes the social-ecological system of La Parguera, Puerto Rico, and identifies the different pressures that have changed this system over the last 40 years. According to the report, multiple pressures have changed this ecosystem, including: sedimentation, nutrient enrichment, elevated seawater temperatures, and overfishing. La Parguera is a small fishing village on the […]

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Traditional Palauan Practices Support Healthy Coral Reefs

A new study has demonstrated what Palauans have known for millennia—cultivated wetlands, in particular taro (Colocasia esculenta) fields, can control soil erosion and reduce the impact of watershed discharges on nearshore coral reefs. Taro fields in Palau are designed with embankments that allow a steady flow of water through the field, using the taro plants […]

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State and Federal Agencies Meet to Improve HAB Surveillance

NOAA and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recently co-sponsored a workshop on harmful algal blooms (HABs) to discuss future monitoring of HAB-related illnesses and outbreaks and to discuss with state representatives how NOAA’s remote sensing capabilities can support HAB surveillance. Attendees provided updates on HAB activities in each state and discussed the CDC’s National […]

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Eating USVI Invasive Lionfish Could Lead to Ciguatera Fish Poisoning

A new report by NCCOS-sponsored researchers shows that consumption of lionfish from the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) could lead to ciguatera fish poisoning. The research team analyzed ciguatera toxin levels in lionfish collected from waters surrounding USVI and found that about 40 percent of USVI lionfish have a measurable level of ciguatera toxin. The team […]

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Measure Value of Ecosystem Services With New Online Survey Tool

The NCCOS applications group has deployed a new online survey and mapping tool that will support social science research on the non-economic values of ecosystem services. This particular implementation of the tool is focused on ecosystem services valuation in National Estuarine Research Reserves and National Marine Sanctuaries. However, with very little modification, the tool could be […]

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