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Does Oyster Aquaculture Affect Nitrogen Loss From Sediments?

Off-bottom oyster aquaculture (Crassostrea virginica) is currently being investigated for possible effects on nutrient processes of surrounding sediments by  a Virginia Sea Grant Research Fellow, Abby Lunstrum, under the guidance of an NCCOS mentor. The research assesses whether, and to what extent, biodeposition from this type of aquaculture operations stimulates loss of nitrogen from the […]

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Oyster Gardening Improves Water Quality, Featured by National Geographic

The innovative “Maryland Grows Oysters” program, designed to use oyster restoration for improvement of water quality in Chesapeake Bay, was featured in a National Geographic video released on October 9. The project uses cages first produced by inmates at the Hagerstown Correctional Facility and then filled with baby oysters (or spat), which are attached to docks at volunteer study locations within the Chesapeake […]

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Fish Farming Improvements Reduce Environmental Impacts of Aquaculture

Advances in fish farming technology and management practices significantly decreased the environmental footprint and increased economic performance of aquaculture in the United States in the last forty years. Marine aquaculture in the United States represents an opportunity to provide healthy, domestic seafood, create jobs, and contribute to coastal economies, likely supplying most of the expected […]

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Best Management Practices Developed for Marine Cage Aquaculture in U.S. Caribbean

Aquaculture supplies more than half of the world’s seafood, and that share is expected to grow in the coming decades. Research shows that aquaculture is sustainable if properly managed. To assist coastal managers and industry with aquaculture development planning, NOS, NMFS, and their partners have developed best management practices for marine cage culture in the […]

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Traditional Palauan Practices Support Healthy Coral Reefs

A new study has demonstrated what Palauans have known for millennia—cultivated wetlands, in particular taro (Colocasia esculenta) fields, can control soil erosion and reduce the impact of watershed discharges on nearshore coral reefs. Taro fields in Palau are designed with embankments that allow a steady flow of water through the field, using the taro plants […]

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NOAA Enlists Help from U.S. Army Reserve to Accomplish Science Missions off North Carolina

NOAA scientists teamed up with soldiers from the U.S. Army Reserve to conduct research off the North Carolina coast. The research was conducted aboard the Army vessel Missionary Ridge, a 175-foot landing craft utility. While approximately 40 miles off the North Carolina coast, Army reservists completed drill training while NOAA researchers collected fish and algae […]

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Aqua Kids Features NCCOS Science on Marine Invasive Species and Aquaculture

A recent episode of Aqua Kids, a children’s television show that reaches over 90 million households, visited NCCOS’s Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research in Beaufort, N.C., to learn more about the center’s research. During the episode, the Aqua Kids explored NCCOS research on sustainable marine aquaculture and how invasive species, such as lionfish, […]

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Partnership with Scottish Coastal Managers Enhances Planning Tools for Marine Aquaculture

The Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS) and the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA) recently hosted NCCOS researchers at a series of meetings to exchange ideas and demonstrate the latest coastal planning and environmental assessment tools for marine aquaculture. The Scots have developed modeling tools to simulate coastal aquaculture environmental interactions, focusing on localized effects […]

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