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NOAA Seminar Series Features Patuxent River Shellfish Aquaculture and Eutrophication Research

A scientist from NCCOS’s Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment described a modeling study in Chesapeake Bay region’s Patuxent River Estuary at the NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series on June 3, 2015. The presentation, titled “Shellfish Aquaculture: A Strategy for Eutrophication Mitigation in the Patuxent River,” reported nitrogen removal estimates through cultivation and harvest of oysters […]

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Getting the Word Out: Sharing the Benefits of Shellfish Aquaculture

Different aspects of shellfish aquaculture science were recently shared on three separate occasions with regional groups that varied from industry partners to regional growers to high school students. These presentations are part of an effort to communicate best practices of shellfish aquaculture to the public and stakeholders so that these methods will be employed in […]

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U.S. and Korea Identify Marine Aquaculture Collaboration Opportunities

Representatives from the NOAA Aquaculture Program, including OAR, NOS, and NMFS, met last week with Korean government officials from National Fisheries Research and Development Institute (NFRDI) in Jeju, Korea to identify joint science priorities for marine aquaculture.  Both nations are working to develop sustainable aquaculture practices in coastal zones including the coastal ocean.  Priorities for collaborative […]

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Southern California Coastal Managers Provide Guidance for Sustainable Offshore Aquaculture Development

NOAA and partners recently convened a two-day workshop to develop a roadmap for sustainable aquaculture development in the coastal waters off Southern California. Participants developed consensus on primary environmental concerns, reviewed the regulatory framework for coastal aquaculture development, and created a coastal manager working group to guide the permitting process. The aquaculture industry in southern […]

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NOAA Supports Development of Offshore Aquaculture in Southern California

California state and federal managers are using NOAA information and tools to develop environmentally sustainable offshore finfish aquaculture in the Southern California Bight—an industry with the potential to generate $1 billion annually. NOAA’s assistance with coastal planning, models of environmental interactions and effects, and siting is helping the state address concerns over environmental impacts that have […]

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Water Quality Improvements Through Shellfish Aquaculture Highlighted in NOAA Science Seminar Series

A recent presentation highlighted a new NCCOS modeling study in Long Island Sound (LIS) and Great Bay Piscataqua Regional Estuaries (GBP) that focused on the water quality benefits of shellfish aquaculture. The presentation, “Eutrophication and Aquaculture; Shellfish can help the Bay!,”reported nitrogen removal estimates through cultivation of oysters equivalent to 1% of total nutrient inputs discharged […]

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NCCOS, Partners Improve Aquaculture Siting and Production in Puget Sound

NCCOS and partners are using computer modeling to determine the carrying capacity for shellfish aquaculture—and the related potential for nutrient removal—in South Puget Sound. The team’s methodologies and guidelines will be used to inform marine spatial planning activities locally and throughout the U.S., promoting sustainable shellfish aquaculture and providing a framework for addressing issues that commonly lead […]

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New Fish Farm Siting and Management Practices Reduce Water Quality Impacts

Scientists with NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) found that fish farm effects on dissolved oxygen and turbidity have been largely eliminated through better management, like using formulated feeds, minimizing feed waste, and properly siting farms in deep waters with flushing currents. The trend toward moving industrial-scale aquaculture into offshore waters is increasingly […]

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