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Spring Flood Outlook Has Implications for Gulf of Mexico and Chesapeake Bay Hypoxia

The NOAA 2014 U.S. Spring Flood Risk Assessment provides an important first look at some of the factors that influence summer hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) in the Gulf of Mexico and the Chesapeake Bay. This year’s predicted elevated flood risk in the Upper Midwest and the Ohio River Valley may result in a larger hypoxic […]

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Ocean Sciences Meeting Highlights Results of Sponsored Research

The 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting showcased the reach and extent of research sponsored by NCCOS, including coral reefs, harmful algal blooms, hypoxia, applying research to management solutions, and integrated ecosystem assessments. NCCOS staff and sponsored research scientists gave over 25 oral and poster presentations and co-chaired a special session on mapping, monitoring, and managing mesophotic […]

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Climate-based Integrated Ecosystem Assessments for Ocean Resource Management

A special issue of the journal Oceanography published in March highlights a number of accomplishments and findings of the U.S. component of the Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics (GLOBEC) program. For over 20 years, this multidisciplinary research program initiated by the United Nations conducted research in the U.S. and around the world, focusing on the potential […]

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New Report Addresses Re-eutrophication and Hypoxia in Lake Erie

A new report aimed at Great Lakes policymakers calls for Lake Erie total phosphorus reductions almost 50 percent greater than previous recommendations. Recent total phosphorus reduction recommendations may not reduce hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) as called for by the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement undertaken by Canada and the United States. Reducing total phosphorus loading […]

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New Research Defines Origin and Dynamic Behavior of Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone

Reducing the size of the widespread area of hypoxia (low oxygen) in the northern Gulf of Mexico—known as the “Dead Zone”—represents one of the nation’s crucial water management challenges. Recent NCCOS-sponsored research has led to the development of a new tool to assess hypoxia formation and its response to key physical and biological drivers. Dr. […]

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Can Asian Carp Barriers Protect the Great Lakes?

Invasive species such as zebra mussels have substantially changed the Great Lakes, with Asian carp poised to become the next and most serious invasive threat. Scientists leading a pioneering NCCOS-sponsored project to forecast the spread and bioeconomic impacts of aquatic invasive species have conducted an expert-based analysis of strategies to keep Asian carp out of Lake Michigan. The […]

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Could Future Land Use Changes Increase Storm Surge Flooding?

Scientists funded by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science have found that projected changes in coastal Gulf of Mexico land use and land cover could increase the extent of storm surge flooding by up to 70 percent above flooding from projected sea level rise alone. Using a newly developed predictive model, the University of […]

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Scenario Forecasts for Regional Coastal Management

Models play an increasingly important role in environmental problems, as decision makers need to consider the consequences of different climatic or environmental conditions, management scenarios, and population trends. Forecasts based on different environmental scenarios can move coastal decision-making to a proactive rather than a reactive mode. NCCOS, through partners within and outside of NOAA, supports […]

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