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Incorporating Shoreline Fluctuations into Tidal Models Improves Sea Level Predictions

Research sponsored by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science demonstrates the importance of incorporating dynamic shoreline changes into models over time to forecast sea level change impacts. Projected sea level change impacts are often depicted by assuming coastlines migrate unaltered over time with the rising or falling sea level. While valid for hard, rocky shorelines, […]

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What Powers Florida Red Tides?

The results of a long-term research project, sponsored by NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, focused on the Gulf of Mexico red tide are featured in a special issue of the scientific journal Harmful Algae. History records blooms of the harmful Florida red tide (caused by the microalgal dinoflagellate Karenia brevis) occurring centuries before Florida’s mid-late […]

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NOAA Supports Reduction in Gulf of Mexico Nutrient Loading

From August 12 – 14, seven of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife-led Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) convened a workshop in Memphis, Tennessee to improve the allocation of wildlife management actions throughout the Mississippi River Basin in a way that reduces nutrient loading and hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico, while balancing agricultural interests and supporting terrestrial […]

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New Molecular Tool Screens Bait Fish for Invasive Species Risk

Sixty-nine of 180 aquatic invasive species (AIS) in the Great Lakes region are fish, many of which pose threats to native species and ecosystem functioning. One potential pathway for AIS introductions is the commercial bait trade; anglers commonly release unused bait fish back into lakes and streams, despite current regulations and management in the Great Lakes region. Previous […]

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Glider Begins Second Deployment to Monitor Threatening Florida Red Tide

A red tide of Karenia brevis in the Gulf of Mexico continues its slow advance toward Florida’s southwest coast. NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) rapid response emergency funding is supporting a second deployment of underwater robotic gliders to track subsurface movement of the red tide. Since mid-July, a large red tide has lingered […]

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NCCOS and Partners Explore Climate-Related Thresholds and Tipping Points

Stakeholders expressed concerns related to climate thresholds and tipping points for coastal systems through a workshop held at the Hollings Marine Lab August 18-19, 2014. Representatives from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, other National Ocean Service (NOS) offices, coastal management groups, and academia discussed the application of tipping point concepts for coastal managers, and associated […]

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Atlantic Ocean Temperature Rise Could Favor Range Expansion of Invasive Lionfish and Native Species

Warming ocean temperatures could favor the expansion of the invasive Indo-Pacific Lionfish and native tropical species distributions within the Atlantic according to a recent study conducted by researchers from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of North Carolina, Wilmington. The study was conducted from 2006–2010 in temperate rocky […]

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Scientists, Partners and the Public Prioritize Marine Resources of Washington’s Olympic Coast

In preparation for future management and research investments, scientists from NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries are collecting information from regional stakeholders and members of the public regarding Washington’s Olympic Coast.  Objectives are to assess the social value of coastal and marine resources, and to determine regional […]

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