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NOAA Embarks on Final Expedition to Investigate Coral Ecosystem Connectivity in Gulf of Mexico

Last week, a NOAA-funded investigation of the relatively healthy deep reefs of Pulley Ridge (off the southwest coast of Florida) began its fourth and final expedition. During the two-week mission, the team will launch a remotely operated vehicle from the University of Miami’s R/V F.G. Walton Smith to photograph benthic and fish communities and collect fish […]

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Origin of Toxic Red Tides in Texas Identified

New modelling research sponsored by NCCOS shows that Texas red tides originate in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico in the Bay of Campeche. These harmful algal blooms, caused by the dinoflagellate alga Karenia brevis, result in large fish kills, human respiratory irritation, and shellfishing closures in affected areas. Unlike red tides on the west coast […]

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NCCOS Hollings Scholar Wins Best Presentation Award

Emily Wallingford, a rising senior at the University of Hawaii at Hilo and a 2015 Hollings Scholar at NOAA’s Beaufort Laboratory, won the best oral presentation award at the 2015 Hollings Symposium on July 27–30. Wallingford’s presentation, “Development of lionfish aggregating devices (LADs) for use as a large-scale control technique,” reported on her research of […]

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The Swiss Army Knife of Missions: Buoys, CHiRP, Drop Cameras, and MBES

An intern blog by Erika Koontz ‘17, Washington College. During the third week of July, I set sail on the NOAA Ship Nancy Foster with scientists from NOAA’s Beaufort lab, Coastal Carolina University (CCU), and Cape Fear Community College (CFCC) for leg two of a project to map essential fish habitat in the Southeast U.S. in support of offshore planning […]

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Hardened Shorelines Make it Hard for Submerged Aquatic Vegetation

A recent NCCOS-funded study found that shoreline hardening, particularly riprap, has a negative effect on the abundance of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). Riprap, which is made up of rocks and boulders piled along the shoreline, is commonly used to prevent shoreline erosion, but once installed, alters the natural processes and composition of the land–sea interface. The […]

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Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone Larger than Predicted After Heavy June Rains

Scientists supported by NOAA NCCOS, EPA and the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative have mapped the size of the 2015 Gulf of Mexico low-oxygen dead zone. The areal extent of hypoxia measures approximately 6,474 square miles, about the size of Connecticut and Massachusetts combined, exceeding the prediction from June. Nutrient run off from agricultural and other human […]

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NCCOS Prepares Toxin Sensor for Deployment in Puget Sound, WA

NCCOS scientist, Tina Mikulski, completed critical calibration of the domoic acid (DA) toxin sensor on an Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) platform located at NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) in Seattle, Washington. This ESP (referred to as ‘ESPfriday’) will be deployed for the first time in Puget Sound beginning in early August and will generate autonomous, […]

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NCCOS Hypoxia Forecasts Prove Accurate

For over ten years NCCOS has developed and improved hypoxia (dead zone) forecasts similar to seasonal weather forecasts. The accuracy of these forecasts is proving to be quite good. Professor Don Scavia of the University of Michigan tracks the accuracy of the NCCOS-funded annual forecasts and finds the models work well in years without hurricanes or […]

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