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South Florida Field Radiometry to Support Cyanobacteria Bloom Detection in Lake Okeechobee

NCCOS staff recently trained several employees of the South Florida Water Management District on the collection of field radiometry for cyanobacteria algorithm development. Radiometry is the measurement of optical radiant energy. As a result of nutrient inputs to Lake Okeechobee, blooms of Anabaena, Microcystis, and other cyanobacteria commonly occur, discoloring the water, producing noxious odors, and making […]

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New Report Addresses Re-eutrophication and Hypoxia in Lake Erie

A new report aimed at Great Lakes policymakers calls for Lake Erie total phosphorus reductions almost 50 percent greater than previous recommendations. Recent total phosphorus reduction recommendations may not reduce hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) as called for by the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement undertaken by Canada and the United States. Reducing total phosphorus loading […]

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New Research Defines Origin and Dynamic Behavior of Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone

Reducing the size of the widespread area of hypoxia (low oxygen) in the northern Gulf of Mexico—known as the “Dead Zone”—represents one of the nation’s crucial water management challenges. Recent NCCOS-sponsored research has led to the development of a new tool to assess hypoxia formation and its response to key physical and biological drivers. Dr. […]

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NOAA Conducts Field Mission to Assess Contaminants in American Samoa

Researchers from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), in collaboration with partners from NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program, recently completed a major field effort to quantify pollution in the Faga’alu Bay watershed in American Samoa. Faga’alu Bay has been designated as a U.S. Coral Reef Task Force priority watershed and is a focus […]

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Working to Understand and Remedy Dead Zone in Green Bay, Wisconsin

Since 2010, NCCOS-sponsored scientists have studied Green Bay, Wisconsin to better understand the source, dynamics, and controls of low oxygen (hypoxia) conditions that have resulted in a “dead zone” in the southern end of the bay. Considered key to understanding hypoxia in Green Bay, researchers have focused on the land surrounding the bay, which accounts […]

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Changes in Climate Could Make Pesticides More Toxic to Estuarine Organisms

During a recent climate webinar offered as part of the NOAA Science Day seminar series, NCCOS’s Marie DeLorenzo explained how changing climate variables may influence pesticide toxicity in the coastal zone. Pesticides enter estuarine waters via runoff and drift from agricultural, turf grass, home and garden, and mosquito control applications. DeLorenzo tested adult and larval […]

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Can Asian Carp Barriers Protect the Great Lakes?

Invasive species such as zebra mussels have substantially changed the Great Lakes, with Asian carp poised to become the next and most serious invasive threat. Scientists leading a pioneering NCCOS-sponsored project to forecast the spread and bioeconomic impacts of aquatic invasive species have conducted an expert-based analysis of strategies to keep Asian carp out of Lake Michigan. The […]

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Partnership with Scottish Coastal Managers Enhances Planning Tools for Marine Aquaculture

The Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS) and the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA) recently hosted NCCOS researchers at a series of meetings to exchange ideas and demonstrate the latest coastal planning and environmental assessment tools for marine aquaculture. The Scots have developed modeling tools to simulate coastal aquaculture environmental interactions, focusing on localized effects […]

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