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Invasive Asian Carp Could Establish in Lake Erie with Little Effect to Native Fishery

A recent study found that if Asian carp establishes in Lake Erie, the native fisheries might not be significantly affected. Based on consultations with Great Lakes and fisheries specialists, the researchers estimated that Asian carp biomass could range from nearly zero to an even larger presence than the current walleye and yellow perch in Lake Erie. From […]

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NCCOS Assists Southwest Alaskan Coastal Resource Management

Scientists from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science traveled to King Salmon, Naknek, and Dillingham, Alaska  from July 17-31, collecting sediments for  toxicity testing, fish  tissues to identify irregularities, and samples of benthic communities, to get a baseline characterization of contaminant conditions. Samples came from the near-shore  and coastal waters of Nushagak and Kvichak Bays, both sub-estuaries of  Bristol […]

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NCCOS Promotes Shellfish Aquaculture to Improve Water Quality

Researchers are exploring the role oyster aquaculture may be playing in improving water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. On July 16, 17, and 23, 2014,  the researchers made visits to three Chesapeake Bay oyster growers to discuss their culture practices, to view their lease areas, and to share information about this joint project. The project also  involves development […]

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NOAA Forecasts and Responds to Lake Erie Harmful Algal Bloom

NOAA scientists are supporting the response to a bloom of cyanobacteria that contaminated drinking water in Lake Erie on August 2nd, leaving nearly 400,000 in Toledo, OH without drinking water for two days.  NOAA’s weekly Lake Erie Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Bulletin tracks the size and location of blooms and predicts their movement until the bloom […]

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Coastal Ocean Acidification: The Other Eutrophication Problem

Eutrophication, or increased nutrient loading to estuaries, causes algae to bloom and consequently coastal hypoxia (low oxygen waters) when the algal biomass decomposes. Often overlooked, eutrophication can also produce carbon dioxide, which leads to a lowering of seawater pH (or increasing acidity). A recent invited paper by scientists supported by NCCOS and the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program shows low […]

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Average 2014 Gulf of Mexico ‘Dead Zone’ Confirms NOAA-supported Forecast

National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science supported scientists documented that the 2014 “dead zone” (area of hypoxia, or low oxygen) in the northern Gulf of Mexico west of the Mississippi River delta now covers 5,052 square miles of sea floor, or about the size of the state of Connecticut. Though average in size and smaller than last year, […]

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Declining Oxygen Levels Threaten Oysters in Chesapeake Bay

NCCOS-sponsored research by the Smithsonian Institution Environmental Research Center (SERC) reveals low dissolved oxygen (hypoxia) hampers oysters’ ability to fight Dermo, a disease that has ravaged oysters throughout the Chesapeake Bay, resulting in up to two to three times more infected oysters than in waters with normal oxygen levels. Hypoxia is commonly studied on large geographic […]

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Stakeholders Meet to Develop First Marine Debris Strategy for the Southeast Region

Last month, NCCOS staff participated in the Southeast Regional Marine Debris Strategy Workshop, which brought together federal, state, academic, and NGO participants from North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia for the first time to strengthen the region’s effectiveness at addressing marine debris issues in coastal communities. Meeting at the Center for Coastal Environmental Health and […]

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