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Spring Flood Outlook Has Implications for Gulf of Mexico and Chesapeake Bay Hypoxia

The NOAA 2014 U.S. Spring Flood Risk Assessment provides an important first look at some of the factors that influence summer hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) in the Gulf of Mexico and the Chesapeake Bay. This year’s predicted elevated flood risk in the Upper Midwest and the Ohio River Valley may result in a larger hypoxic […]

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Baseline Assessment of Marine Ecosystems in St. John Aids Coastal Management

A new NCCOS study presents baseline information about the ecology and pollution stress in Coral and Fish Bays in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands. The information will help support evaluations of the effectiveness of watershed management activities, including those funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The study quantified the biogeographic status of the […]

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State and Federal Agencies Meet to Improve HAB Surveillance

NOAA and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recently co-sponsored a workshop on harmful algal blooms (HABs) to discuss future monitoring of HAB-related illnesses and outbreaks and to discuss with state representatives how NOAA’s remote sensing capabilities can support HAB surveillance. Attendees provided updates on HAB activities in each state and discussed the CDC’s National […]

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New Assay Rapidly Detects Pathogens in Marine Mammals

A three-year project by NCCOS scientists has culminated in a reliable tool for rapid detection of pathogenic Brucella bacteria in clinical samples from marine mammals. Rapid detection of these pathogens in marine mammals has been difficult ever since Brucella infections were first recognized in marine mammals in the 1990s. Brucellosis, a Brucella-based reproductive disease, is […]

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Marine Life in Gulf of Mexico Face Multiple Challenges

By Maggie Broadwater, Guest Blogger from NOAA’s Harmful Algal Bloom Analytical Response Team. Animals living in coastal waters can face a number of environmental stressors—both from nature and from humans—which, in turn, may have compounding effects. This may be the case for marine life in the Gulf of Mexico which experiences both oil spills and the […]

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Eating USVI Invasive Lionfish Could Lead to Ciguatera Fish Poisoning

A new report by NCCOS-sponsored researchers shows that consumption of lionfish from the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) could lead to ciguatera fish poisoning. The research team analyzed ciguatera toxin levels in lionfish collected from waters surrounding USVI and found that about 40 percent of USVI lionfish have a measurable level of ciguatera toxin. The team […]

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NOAA Helps Plan National Study on Nutrient Trends in Nation’s Waters

NCCOS’s Dr. Rob Magnien recently represented NOAA at a planning session of the National Academy of Sciences Water Science and Technology Board. The purpose of the meeting was to plan and explore the scientific dimensions and challenges of monitoring and detecting changes in nutrient levels in the nation’s surface and ground water. Over the past […]

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Chesapeake Bay Dead Zones Show Marine Worm Species Shifts

A recent NCCOS-sponsored study conducted by the University of Maryland’s Center for Environmental Science has found a hypoxia-induced shift in marine worm communities in Chesapeake Bay to ones made up of species that are extremely adaptable to stressful conditions like hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen). The team also found that the magnitude of the marine worm […]

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