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Climate Patterns Influence Amount of Fecal Bacteria in Maryland Shellfish Harvest Waters

NCCOS scientists and their partners have identified a link between inter-annual patterns of precipitation and air temperature and fecal coliform levels in shellfish harvest waters in Maryland’s portion of the Chesapeake Bay. Drawing on 34 years of monitoring data (1979–2013) from the Maryland Department of the Environment, the team found that fecal coliform tended to be […]

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Measuring Sunscreen Chemicals in South Carolina Coastal Waters

A recent NCCOS study in Marine Pollution Bulletin investigated the distribution of five sunscreen ingredients (oxybenzone, octocrylene, avobenzone, padimate-O, and octinoxate) measured in the coastal waters of South Carolina.  Sunscreen chemicals are increasingly used in personal care products to protect the skin from the damaging effects of UV radiation; however, laboratory studies showed that some of these chemicals […]

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Study Supports EPA to Control Both Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Freshwaters

One of the most common bloom-forming cyanobacteria (blue green algae) in freshwater ecosystems is Microcystis, which produces the liver toxin microcystin. Like many cyanobacteria, blooms of Microcystis are associated with higher temperatures and the availability of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Many freshwater ecosystems are P-limited, meaning P plays the key role in the occurrence of most cyanobacteria blooms, […]

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National Coastal Ocean and Estuary Conference Provides Platform for NCCOS Research

The 23rd biennial Coasatal and Estuarine Research Federation Conference (CERF), held in Portland, Oregon this November, highlighted the scope of research sponsored by NCCOS including harmful algae and their toxins and ocean acidification and hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) interactions. NCCOS exclusively hosted a major session and co-hosted a second major session with the NOAA Office of Oceanic […]

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NCCOS Delivers Hard Truths on Hardened Shorelines in the Mid-Atlantic

NCCOS-sponsored researchers have found that hardened shorelines have negative effects on fish; invertebrates, such as oysters and crabs; and submerged aquatic vegetation. Shoreline hardening is an attempt to stabilize coastal land and protect residential and commercial infrastructure along the coast by building structures, like seawalls, to hold back the sea and prevent the loss of sediment. […]

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Mesocosm Research Highlighted at International Meeting

Mesocosms are versatile test systems that can examine both structural and functional components of aquatic ecosystems in a laboratory setting. Since the late 1990s, researchers at NCCOS’s Charleston, South Carolina, laboratory have used mesocosms to evaluate the fate and effects of individual chemical contaminants and mixtures in a simulated salt marsh ecosystem. In a presentation […]

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NOAA and Partners Evaluate Oyster Nutrient Removal as Best Management Practice for the Chesapeake

Scientists from NCCOS and the Northeast Fisheries Science Center were selected by the Chesapeake Bay Program Water Quality Goal Implementation Team, along with university researchers, federal, state and local resource managers, to serve on the Oyster Best Management Practice Expert Panel. The charge to the 13 member panel, conducted by the Oyster Recovery Partnership, is […]

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NOAA and Navy Investigate Seasonal Cetacean Distribution In and Around St. Andrew Bay, Fla.

NCCOS researchers recently completed field work to identify the seasonal distribution and abundance of cetacean species in proximity to the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Panama City, Fla. The study—a collaboration among NCCOS, NOAA Fisheries, and the U.S. Navy—will examine whether cetacean distribution is correlated with particular environmental parameters or habitat types, which could aid future […]

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