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Addressing the Decline of Michigan’s Saginaw Bay

NCCOS-funded scientists participated in a recent forum held by the Michigan House Democrats’ Great Lakes and Conservation Task Force to address human-caused stresses to Lake Huron’s Saginaw Bay. The team presented findings and recommendations related to phosphorus inputs and eutrophication symptoms that are adversely affecting the bay’s fisheries and water quality. The NCCOS-funded team is […]

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Restoring Saginaw Bay: NCCOS Provides Managers Science-based Recommendations

On May 22, NCCOS researchers delivered a set of recommendations to state and federal natural resource managers and policy makers focused on addressing multiple contaminant stressors impacting Saginaw Bay, one of several critical areas of concern identified by the EPA for restoration in Lake Huron. Findings from the  5-year project present state-of-the-science information on how stresses such as […]

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NCCOS Research Highlighted at International Association for Great Lakes Research Conference

On June 2-6, NCCOS led several sessions at this year’s International Association for Great Lakes Research annual conference at Purdue University. Our Great Lakes research addresses critical ecosystem and watershed-scale issues in the region such as invasive species, nutrient management hypoxia and impacts of multiple stressors. Sessions featuring NCCOS  science included: Using Data and Models to Link […]

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Locavores, Meet Invasivores: Cooking and Eating Invasive Lionfish at Haven – Houston – Restaurants and Dining – Eating Our Words

Invasive species are nothing new. Neither is eating them, as anyone who’s eaten Cambodian water spinach — much of it grown here in Houston — will tell you. But bringing in water spinach from Cambodia and growing it for profit (despite its status over here as a noxious weed) is entirely different from eating species […]

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Project Finds Fish Prefer Natural Shorelines

The U.S. benefits from a wealth of resources and activities that depend on healthy coastal habitats. However, these habitats are being degraded by extensive hardening of shorelines due to climate-driven sea level rise, increasing shoreline development, land use changes in coastal watersheds, pollution, and invasions of non-native species.  In the Mid-Atlantic region alone, coastal development […]

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Surprise lionfish catch in Gulf of Mexico a cause for concern over invasive non-native fish | ABC Action News

While fishing in about 10 feet of water on the hard-bottom reef patches just 200 yards from shore near the Ritz Carlton, Mike Damanski confirmed the inevitable when something unexpected showed up on the end of his line. Damanski, who was out fishing with his mom and some friends for his birthday last week, landed […]

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NOAA Communicator – Issue 22 – November, 2012

James Morris, a National Ocean Service ecologist, works in the Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research in Beaufort, N.C., conducting research on invasive species, aquaculture, and other issues that affect coastal ecosystems. The center is one of the NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. In 2011, Morris received the Presidential Early Career Award […]

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FIS – Worldnews – Lionfish processed to feed marine species

A team of researchers from the Regional Fisheries Research Centre of Puerto Morelos and the Multidisciplinary Unit of Teaching and Research of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) has developed technology for the commercial use of lionfish (Pterois sp). The goal is to obtain fish feed from this fish for fattening yellowtail snapper that […]

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