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Invasive Asian Carp Could Establish in Lake Erie with Little Effect to Native Fishery

A recent study found that if Asian carp establishes in Lake Erie, the native fisheries might not be significantly affected. Based on consultations with Great Lakes and fisheries specialists, the researchers estimated that Asian carp biomass could range from nearly zero to an even larger presence than the current walleye and yellow perch in Lake Erie. From […]

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Study Informs Restoration of Michigan’s Saginaw Bay

A 2014 special issue of the Journal of Great Lakes Research details the findings of a five-year, NCCOS-funded project in Michigan’s Saginaw Bay designed to better inform bay restoration efforts. The special issue highlights research results from studies that address the bay’s various environmental stressors. Saginaw Bay in Lake Huron and its surrounding watershed support a […]

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Eating USVI Invasive Lionfish Could Lead to Ciguatera Fish Poisoning

A new report by NCCOS-sponsored researchers shows that consumption of lionfish from the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) could lead to ciguatera fish poisoning. The research team analyzed ciguatera toxin levels in lionfish collected from waters surrounding USVI and found that about 40 percent of USVI lionfish have a measurable level of ciguatera toxin. The team […]

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Assessing Invasive Asian Carp’s Potential to Spread to Great Lakes

Invasive Asian carp have established themselves in many lakes and river systems in the upper mid-West. Once established, they have wreaked havoc on existing food chains. Some of these invasive carp have been caught in Lake Erie. In anticipation of a possible invasion of the Great Lakes system, researchers from the National Centers for Coastal […]

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Invasive Grass Carp and Impacts to Great Lakes

Non-native Grass Carp, introduced to U.S. ponds and lakes by federal and state agencies in the early 1960s, were considered a low cost, nonchemical alternative for aquatic weed control. Despite the common use of sterile Grass Carp as a biological control agent, scientists remain uncertain about the ecological risk the carp pose to North American freshwater […]

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Guam Students Learn About Coastal Resilience and Conservation

Over a decade ago, fishermen in the village of Umatac (Humåtak) off the southwest coast of Guam found they were not catching the same size and quality of fish. Researchers identified one of the primary reasons to be an accelerated rate of erosion caused by the introduction of feral ungulates (pigs, goats, and deer) and […]

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Aqua Kids Features NCCOS Science on Marine Invasive Species and Aquaculture

A recent episode of Aqua Kids, a children’s television show that reaches over 90 million households, visited NCCOS’s Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research in Beaufort, N.C., to learn more about the center’s research. During the episode, the Aqua Kids explored NCCOS research on sustainable marine aquaculture and how invasive species, such as lionfish, […]

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Can Asian Carp Barriers Protect the Great Lakes?

Invasive species such as zebra mussels have substantially changed the Great Lakes, with Asian carp poised to become the next and most serious invasive threat. Scientists leading a pioneering NCCOS-sponsored project to forecast the spread and bioeconomic impacts of aquatic invasive species have conducted an expert-based analysis of strategies to keep Asian carp out of Lake Michigan. The […]

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