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NCCOS Hollings Scholar Wins Best Presentation Award

Emily Wallingford, a rising senior at the University of Hawaii at Hilo and a 2015 Hollings Scholar at NOAA’s Beaufort Laboratory, won the best oral presentation award at the 2015 Hollings Symposium on July 27–30. Wallingford’s presentation, “Development of lionfish aggregating devices (LADs) for use as a large-scale control technique,” reported on her research of […]

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New Recruits Comprise most of Coral Area Found in 2014

A completed analysis from the 2014 expedition to Pulley Ridge based on remotely operated vehicle (ROV) observations revealed significant areas of new coral growth. The findings were compiled from a total of 24 ROV dives to characterize the mesophotic coral reef ecosystems off the southwest coast of Florida and the Tortugas, and determined over 56.5 percent […]

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Pulley Ridge Corals Show Potential Signs of Recovery After 10-Year Decline

An NCCOS-funded study has produced a detailed characterization of the deep (60–80 meters), mesophotic reefs and fish populations of Pulley Ridge, located off the southwest coast of Florida. While the study shows a decade-long decrease in coral cover at Pulley Ridge, when compared with data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in 2003, the findings […]

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Invasive Lionfish Web Portal Supports Community Management and Education

The newly released Invasive Lionfish Web Portal, developed by the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute in partnership with NOAA, supports the managment and control of lionfish in conservation areas along the Southeast coast of the U.S. and Caribbean. The invasive lionfish now threatens reef communities from North Carolina to South America with extreme impacts to […]

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NOAA Facilitates Regional Consensus On Lionfish Harvesting Strategies

First reported in the 1980s, the venomous Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois miles and P. volitans) is widely established along the Southeast U.S. and Caribbean. Now invading the Gulf of Mexico and South America, estimates of lionfish densities indicate lionfish even surpassed some native species. Lionfish could permanently impact native reef fish communities, as they occupy the […]

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New Molecular Tool Screens Bait Fish for Invasive Species Risk

Sixty-nine of 180 aquatic invasive species (AIS) in the Great Lakes region are fish, many of which pose threats to native species and ecosystem functioning. One potential pathway for AIS introductions is the commercial bait trade; anglers commonly release unused bait fish back into lakes and streams, despite current regulations and management in the Great Lakes region. Previous […]

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Invasive Asian Carp Could Establish in Lake Erie with Little Effect to Native Fishery

A recent study found that if Asian carp establishes in Lake Erie, the native fisheries might not be significantly affected. Based on consultations with Great Lakes and fisheries specialists, the researchers estimated that Asian carp biomass could range from nearly zero to an even larger presence than the current walleye and yellow perch in Lake Erie. From […]

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Study Informs Restoration of Michigan’s Saginaw Bay

A 2014 special issue of the Journal of Great Lakes Research details the findings of a five-year, NCCOS-funded project in Michigan’s Saginaw Bay designed to better inform bay restoration efforts. The special issue highlights research results from studies that address the bay’s various environmental stressors. Saginaw Bay in Lake Huron and its surrounding watershed support a […]

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