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Guam Students Learn About Coastal Resilience and Conservation

Over a decade ago, fishermen in the village of Umatac (Humåtak) off the southwest coast of Guam found they were not catching the same size and quality of fish. Researchers identified one of the primary reasons to be an accelerated rate of erosion caused by the introduction of feral ungulates (pigs, goats, and deer) and […]

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Marine Shellfish Get a ‘One-Two Punch’ from Acidification and Low Oxygen

Recent research has shown that ocean acidification and low oxygen interact to harm early life stages of bay scallops (Argopecten irradians) and hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria). The study, conducted by Stony Brook University and sponsored by NCCOS and NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program, found that the combined effects of low pH (high acidity) and low oxygen […]

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Environmental Conditions Can Influence Development of Dermo Disease in Oysters

A recent NCCOS-sponsored study by the Smithsonian Institution showed that long-term exposure to daily fluctuations of hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) increased Dermo disease (Perkinsus marinus) infection in previously uninfected eastern oysters. Surprisingly, daily-cycling pH (a measure of acidity) did not affect Dermo disease infection levels in conjunction with daily-cycling hypoxia or with continuous normal oxygen […]

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Ocean Sciences Meeting Highlights Results of Sponsored Research

The 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting showcased the reach and extent of research sponsored by NCCOS, including coral reefs, harmful algal blooms, hypoxia, applying research to management solutions, and integrated ecosystem assessments. NCCOS staff and sponsored research scientists gave over 25 oral and poster presentations and co-chaired a special session on mapping, monitoring, and managing mesophotic […]

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South Florida Field Radiometry to Support Cyanobacteria Bloom Detection in Lake Okeechobee

NCCOS staff recently trained several employees of the South Florida Water Management District on the collection of field radiometry for cyanobacteria algorithm development. Radiometry is the measurement of optical radiant energy. As a result of nutrient inputs to Lake Okeechobee, blooms of Anabaena, Microcystis, and other cyanobacteria commonly occur, discoloring the water, producing noxious odors, and making […]

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New Report Addresses Re-eutrophication and Hypoxia in Lake Erie

A new report aimed at Great Lakes policymakers calls for Lake Erie total phosphorus reductions almost 50 percent greater than previous recommendations. Recent total phosphorus reduction recommendations may not reduce hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) as called for by the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement undertaken by Canada and the United States. Reducing total phosphorus loading […]

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New Research Defines Origin and Dynamic Behavior of Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone

Reducing the size of the widespread area of hypoxia (low oxygen) in the northern Gulf of Mexico—known as the “Dead Zone”—represents one of the nation’s crucial water management challenges. Recent NCCOS-sponsored research has led to the development of a new tool to assess hypoxia formation and its response to key physical and biological drivers. Dr. […]

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Working to Understand and Remedy Dead Zone in Green Bay, Wisconsin

Since 2010, NCCOS-sponsored scientists have studied Green Bay, Wisconsin to better understand the source, dynamics, and controls of low oxygen (hypoxia) conditions that have resulted in a “dead zone” in the southern end of the bay. Considered key to understanding hypoxia in Green Bay, researchers have focused on the land surrounding the bay, which accounts […]

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