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South Florida Field Radiometry to Support Cyanobacteria Bloom Detection in Lake Okeechobee

NCCOS staff recently trained several employees of the South Florida Water Management District on the collection of field radiometry for cyanobacteria algorithm development. Radiometry is the measurement of optical radiant energy. As a result of nutrient inputs to Lake Okeechobee, blooms of Anabaena, Microcystis, and other cyanobacteria commonly occur, discoloring the water, producing noxious odors, and making […]

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New Report Addresses Re-eutrophication and Hypoxia in Lake Erie

A new report aimed at Great Lakes policymakers calls for Lake Erie total phosphorus reductions almost 50 percent greater than previous recommendations. Recent total phosphorus reduction recommendations may not reduce hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) as called for by the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement undertaken by Canada and the United States. Reducing total phosphorus loading […]

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New Research Defines Origin and Dynamic Behavior of Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone

Reducing the size of the widespread area of hypoxia (low oxygen) in the northern Gulf of Mexico—known as the “Dead Zone”—represents one of the nation’s crucial water management challenges. Recent NCCOS-sponsored research has led to the development of a new tool to assess hypoxia formation and its response to key physical and biological drivers. Dr. […]

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Working to Understand and Remedy Dead Zone in Green Bay, Wisconsin

Since 2010, NCCOS-sponsored scientists have studied Green Bay, Wisconsin to better understand the source, dynamics, and controls of low oxygen (hypoxia) conditions that have resulted in a “dead zone” in the southern end of the bay. Considered key to understanding hypoxia in Green Bay, researchers have focused on the land surrounding the bay, which accounts […]

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Ocean Acidification Promotes Disruptive and Harmful Algal Blooms on Our Coasts

The general decline in ocean pH (i.e., more acidic conditions) from the increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) is well documented. Also well documented are increased nutrients entering coastal waters often promoting excessive and ecosystem disruptive algae blooms, including harmful algal blooms. The decay of these coastal blooms promotes bacterial respiration resulting in increased CO2, […]

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Using Shellfish Aquaculture to Improve Water Quality in Long Island Sound and Great Bay Estuaries

On Nov. 18, staff from NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and Northeast Fisheries Laboratory met with outside partners to continue investigating the potential importance of shellfish aquaculture in removing nutrients and improving water quality in the Long Island Sound and Great Bay/Piscataqua River Estuaries. The results of this EPA Regional Ecosystem Services Program–funded study […]

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Helping Millersville University Students Understand Eutrophication and Consider Careers in Science

Dr. Suzanne Bricker from NOAA’s Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment recently gave a guest lecture on eutrophication at Millersville University in Millersville, Pa. The lecture—“Eutrophication (nutrient pollution) in U.S. Coastal Waters and Elsewhere”—described current nutrient-related water quality conditions in U.S. estuaries and changes since the early 1990s, the factors influencing development of observed problems, […]

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NCCOS Research in Today’s Rapidly Changing Global Environment

Two national science conferences recently highlighted NCCOS research: The theme at the 7th Symposium on Harmful Algae in the United States (Oct. 27–31, 2013; Sarasota, FL) was harmful algal blooms (HABs) in a changing world, especially a more acidic one. NCCOS HAB scientists and sponsored researchers  organized, advised,  chaired sessions, and presented some 13 oral […]

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