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News and Features by Research Area or Topic

Ocean Acidification Promotes Disruptive and Harmful Algal Blooms on Our Coasts

The general decline in ocean pH (i.e., more acidic conditions) from the increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) is well documented. Also well documented are increased nutrients entering coastal waters often promoting excessive and ecosystem disruptive algae blooms, including harmful algal blooms. The decay of these coastal blooms promotes bacterial respiration resulting in increased CO2, […]

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Using Shellfish Aquaculture to Improve Water Quality in Long Island Sound and Great Bay Estuaries

On Nov. 18, staff from NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and Northeast Fisheries Laboratory met with outside partners to continue investigating the potential importance of shellfish aquaculture in removing nutrients and improving water quality in the Long Island Sound and Great Bay/Piscataqua River Estuaries. The results of this EPA Regional Ecosystem Services Program–funded study […]

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Helping Millersville University Students Understand Eutrophication and Consider Careers in Science

Dr. Suzanne Bricker from NOAA’s Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment recently gave a guest lecture on eutrophication at Millersville University in Millersville, Pa. The lecture—“Eutrophication (nutrient pollution) in U.S. Coastal Waters and Elsewhere”—described current nutrient-related water quality conditions in U.S. estuaries and changes since the early 1990s, the factors influencing development of observed problems, […]

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NCCOS Research in Today’s Rapidly Changing Global Environment

Two national science conferences recently highlighted NCCOS research: The theme at the 7th Symposium on Harmful Algae in the United States (Oct. 27–31, 2013; Sarasota, FL) was harmful algal blooms (HABs) in a changing world, especially a more acidic one. NCCOS HAB scientists and sponsored researchers  organized, advised,  chaired sessions, and presented some 13 oral […]

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Addressing the Decline of Michigan’s Saginaw Bay

NCCOS-funded scientists participated in a recent forum held by the Michigan House Democrats’ Great Lakes and Conservation Task Force to address human-caused stresses to Lake Huron’s Saginaw Bay. The team presented findings and recommendations related to phosphorus inputs and eutrophication symptoms that are adversely affecting the bay’s fisheries and water quality. The NCCOS-funded team is […]

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NCCOS Expertise Contributes to U.S. National Climate Assessment

Four NCCOS scientists wrote a NOAA technical report on “Oceans and Marine Resources in a Changing Climate” that led to a chapter in the Third National Climate Assessment (2013), produced by the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Carol Auer, Quay Dortch, Elizabeth Jewett, and Cary Lopez participated in this comprehensive review, wherein 63 experts examined […]

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NCCOS Research Underpins International Lake Erie Ecosystem Report

With Lake Erie threatened again by eutrophication and harmful algal blooms, the Great Lakes International Joint Commission (IJC) recently established a “Lake Erie Ecosystem Priority” (LEEP) initiative to provide advice to governments to develop policy and implement management approaches to restore the lake’s ecosystem. The IJC released the LEEP report on August 29, 2013 for […]

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NCCOS Research Results Impact International Policy

On September 10, 2013, NCCOS-sponsored researcher Dr. Don Scavia will be a panelist at the Great Lakes Triennial Meeting focusing on Lake Erie. This forum is designed to inform and engage the public regarding the new Lake Erie Ecosystem Priority (LEEP) study report that was commissioned by the International Joint Commission (IJC) in 2012 to […]

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