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Workshop Explores Fisheries Management in Face of Mississippi River Diversions and Hypoxia

Last month’s Fifth Annual Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Research Coordination Workshop continued its tradition of advancing the science that informs fisheries and resource managers about the effects of Gulf hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen). The workshop also provided a forum to assess and predict the potential ecological and socioeconomic effects of Mississippi River diversions. Large-scale ecosystem […]

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New Research Funding Opportunities Available for 2015

The National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science’s (NCCOS) Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research (CSCOR) has released three competitive Federal Funding Opportunities for the 2015 Fiscal Year beginning October 1, 2014. The competitive Federal Funding Announcements of Opportunity (FFOs), published in Grants.gov, are: 2015 Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise Program 2015 Northern Gulf of […]

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NCCOS Promotes Shellfish Aquaculture to Improve Water Quality

Researchers are exploring the role oyster aquaculture may be playing in improving water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. On July 16, 17, and 23, 2014,  the researchers made visits to three Chesapeake Bay oyster growers to discuss their culture practices, to view their lease areas, and to share information about this joint project. The project also  involves development […]

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Coastal Ocean Acidification: The Other Eutrophication Problem

Eutrophication, or increased nutrient loading to estuaries, causes algae to bloom and consequently coastal hypoxia (low oxygen waters) when the algal biomass decomposes. Often overlooked, eutrophication can also produce carbon dioxide, which leads to a lowering of seawater pH (or increasing acidity). A recent invited paper by scientists supported by NCCOS and the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program shows low […]

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Average 2014 Gulf of Mexico ‘Dead Zone’ Confirms NOAA-supported Forecast

National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science supported scientists documented that the 2014 “dead zone” (area of hypoxia, or low oxygen) in the northern Gulf of Mexico west of the Mississippi River delta now covers 5,052 square miles of sea floor, or about the size of the state of Connecticut. Though average in size and smaller than last year, […]

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Declining Oxygen Levels Threaten Oysters in Chesapeake Bay

NCCOS-sponsored research by the Smithsonian Institution Environmental Research Center (SERC) reveals low dissolved oxygen (hypoxia) hampers oysters’ ability to fight Dermo, a disease that has ravaged oysters throughout the Chesapeake Bay, resulting in up to two to three times more infected oysters than in waters with normal oxygen levels. Hypoxia is commonly studied on large geographic […]

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NOAA, Partners Issue Dead Zone Predictions for Gulf of Mexico and Chesapeake Bay

Scientists are expecting an average, but still large, hypoxic or “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico this year, and a slightly above-average hypoxic zone in the Chesapeake Bay. NOAA-supported modeling is forecasting this year’s Gulf of Mexico hypoxic (very low oxygen) zone to cover an area ranging from 4,633 to 5,708 square miles (12,000 […]

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Gliders Map Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone

This summer, NCCOS-sponsored scientists from Texas A&M University will test the use of gliders to monitor and map hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The team will deploy five autonomous underwater vehicle gliders and one autonomous surface vehicle over the Louisiana coastal shelf and associated offshore region, while also taking shipboard hypoxia (low dissolved […]

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