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Traditional Palauan Practices Support Healthy Coral Reefs

A new study has demonstrated what Palauans have known for millennia—cultivated wetlands, in particular taro (Colocasia esculenta) fields, can control soil erosion and reduce the impact of watershed discharges on nearshore coral reefs. Taro fields in Palau are designed with embankments that allow a steady flow of water through the field, using the taro plants […]

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Glider Implementation Plan Provides Blueprint for Improved Monitoring of Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone

The Glider Implementation Plan for Hypoxia Monitoring in the Gulf of Mexico is now available to guide the use of autonomous underwater vehicles for enhanced monitoring of seasonal hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The need for improved monitoring of the hypoxic zone (dead zone) has been repeatedly emphasized by the Interagency Gulf Hypoxia Task […]

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Forensic Genomics Used to Identify Causes of Ocean Mass Mortality Events

Fish and invertebrate mass mortality events are increasing in coastal zones worldwide, but in many cases it can be difficult to pinpoint the cause of death. Toxic spills, hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen), disease outbreaks, and toxin-producing harmful algal blooms possibly cause these events, but it is critical from a management and response perspective to accurately […]

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Spring Flood Outlook Has Implications for Gulf of Mexico and Chesapeake Bay Hypoxia

The NOAA 2014 U.S. Spring Flood Risk Assessment provides an important first look at some of the factors that influence summer hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) in the Gulf of Mexico and the Chesapeake Bay. This year’s predicted elevated flood risk in the Upper Midwest and the Ohio River Valley may result in a larger hypoxic […]

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State and Federal Agencies Meet to Improve HAB Surveillance

NOAA and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recently co-sponsored a workshop on harmful algal blooms (HABs) to discuss future monitoring of HAB-related illnesses and outbreaks and to discuss with state representatives how NOAA’s remote sensing capabilities can support HAB surveillance. Attendees provided updates on HAB activities in each state and discussed the CDC’s National […]

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NOAA Helps Plan National Study on Nutrient Trends in Nation’s Waters

NCCOS’s Dr. Rob Magnien recently represented NOAA at a planning session of the National Academy of Sciences Water Science and Technology Board. The purpose of the meeting was to plan and explore the scientific dimensions and challenges of monitoring and detecting changes in nutrient levels in the nation’s surface and ground water. Over the past […]

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Chesapeake Bay Dead Zones Show Marine Worm Species Shifts

A recent NCCOS-sponsored study conducted by the University of Maryland’s Center for Environmental Science has found a hypoxia-induced shift in marine worm communities in Chesapeake Bay to ones made up of species that are extremely adaptable to stressful conditions like hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen). The team also found that the magnitude of the marine worm […]

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Guam Students Learn About Coastal Resilience and Conservation

Over a decade ago, fishermen in the village of Umatac (Humåtak) off the southwest coast of Guam found they were not catching the same size and quality of fish. Researchers identified one of the primary reasons to be an accelerated rate of erosion caused by the introduction of feral ungulates (pigs, goats, and deer) and […]

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