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NCCOS helps Pennsylvania Prepare for Lake Erie Blooms

When Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett learned of the large toxic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) bloom that disrupted the drinking water supply for hundreds of thousands of Ohio’s citizens, he expressed confidence his state was proactively planning to mitigate any potential human health impacts from toxic cyanobacteria blooms. This confidence grew from the state Department of Environmental Protection […]

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How Climate Change Could Impact Harmful Algal Blooms

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are projected to increase as sea surface temperatures rise and ocean acidification continues according to Dr. Alan Lewitus, of NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. His findings were shared during a symposium at George Mason University in October which covered such topics as climate change and extreme weather effects on […]

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NCCOS Partners with White House to Improve Detection of Excess Nutrients in Aquatic Environments

Earlier this month, NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and other partners joined the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy in Washington, DC for a workshop to accelerate the development and adoption of nutrient sensors. Excessive amounts of nutrients (mainly nitrogen and phosphorus) entering lakes, rivers, streams, and coastal waters are causing […]

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Tenacity of Brown Tides Linked to Genetic Flexibility

The genetic flexibility of Aureococcus anophagefferens, the harmful alga responsible for “brown tides” off Long Island, allows it to thrive in conditions other algae cannot tolerate. NCCOS-sponsored scientists assessed this alga’s response to environmental stressors, such as low nutrients and low light, by looking at pieces of its RNA, which tell Aureococcus which proteins to […]

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NOAA Facilitates Regional Consensus On Lionfish Harvesting Strategies

First reported in the 1980s, the venomous Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois miles and P. volitans) is widely established along the Southeast U.S. and Caribbean. Now invading the Gulf of Mexico and South America, estimates of lionfish densities indicate lionfish even surpassed some native species. Lionfish could permanently impact native reef fish communities, as they occupy the […]

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NOAA Supports Reduction in Gulf of Mexico Nutrient Loading

From August 12 – 14, seven of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife-led Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) convened a workshop in Memphis, Tennessee to improve the allocation of wildlife management actions throughout the Mississippi River Basin in a way that reduces nutrient loading and hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico, while balancing agricultural interests and supporting terrestrial […]

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New Molecular Tool Screens Bait Fish for Invasive Species Risk

Sixty-nine of 180 aquatic invasive species (AIS) in the Great Lakes region are fish, many of which pose threats to native species and ecosystem functioning. One potential pathway for AIS introductions is the commercial bait trade; anglers commonly release unused bait fish back into lakes and streams, despite current regulations and management in the Great Lakes region. Previous […]

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International Conference Explores Emerging Contaminants in the Environment

Last month’s Fourth International EmCon Conference continued its tradition of advancing the science of emerging contaminants in the environment. NCCOS scientists presented research on how exposure of shrimp to antimicrobial compounds affects associated Vibrio bacterial density, and development of antibiotic resistance. The EmCon conference provided a forum to inform coastal managers about the occurrence, fate, […]

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