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NCCOS and Partners Explore Climate-Related Thresholds and Tipping Points

Stakeholders expressed concerns related to climate thresholds and tipping points for coastal systems through a workshop held at the Hollings Marine Lab August 18-19, 2014. Representatives from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, other National Ocean Service (NOS) offices, coastal management groups, and academia discussed the application of tipping point concepts for coastal managers, and associated […]

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Spring Flood Outlook Has Implications for Gulf of Mexico and Chesapeake Bay Hypoxia

The NOAA 2014 U.S. Spring Flood Risk Assessment provides an important first look at some of the factors that influence summer hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) in the Gulf of Mexico and the Chesapeake Bay. This year’s predicted elevated flood risk in the Upper Midwest and the Ohio River Valley may result in a larger hypoxic […]

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Surface Elevation Trends Help Us Prepare for Climate Change

Predicting future patterns of coastal inundation from sea level rise requires knowledge of changes in sea level and changes in elevation of land surface. Surface elevation tables—mechanical devices permanently installed in wetlands—allow scientists to measure small changes in surface elevation precisely and accurately. These devices have been installed in coastal wetlands across the U.S. by […]

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Climate-based Integrated Ecosystem Assessments for Ocean Resource Management

A special issue of the journal Oceanography published in March highlights a number of accomplishments and findings of the U.S. component of the Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics (GLOBEC) program. For over 20 years, this multidisciplinary research program initiated by the United Nations conducted research in the U.S. and around the world, focusing on the potential […]

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Could Future Land Use Changes Increase Storm Surge Flooding?

Scientists funded by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science have found that projected changes in coastal Gulf of Mexico land use and land cover could increase the extent of storm surge flooding by up to 70 percent above flooding from projected sea level rise alone. Using a newly developed predictive model, the University of […]

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Sea Level Rise Research Supports Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative

An NCCOS-funded study is investigating the ecological effects of sea level rise in the Gulf of Mexico. The effort is the focal point of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative, a federal–state partnership established to advance sea level rise prediction and assessment capabilities. The cooperative seeks to improve coastal data and research products […]

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NCCOS Expertise Contributes to U.S. National Climate Assessment

Four NCCOS scientists wrote a NOAA technical report on “Oceans and Marine Resources in a Changing Climate” that led to a chapter in the Third National Climate Assessment (2013), produced by the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Carol Auer, Quay Dortch, Elizabeth Jewett, and Cary Lopez participated in this comprehensive review, wherein 63 experts examined […]

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Zooplankton Show Ability to Adapt to Stress of Starvation and Climate Change

NCCOS sponsored research on zooplankton response to Harmful Algal Blooms has also yielded information on how zooplankton respond to climate change and environmental stress. Zooplankton play a central role in food webs from phytoplankton to fish and are also important in the biogeochemical cycles of lakes and oceans. Two recent studies from Dr. Hans Dam […]

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