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NCCOS-sponsored Research Paper Receives Annual Award

An NCCOS-sponsored project publication was selected for the 2012 Chandler-Misener Award by the Journal of Great Lakes Research.   Titled “Historical pattern of phosphorus loading to Lake Erie watersheds,” the paper quantifies trends in phosphorus (P) loading to Lake Erie watersheds from 1935 to 2007. Over this 70-year period, P input to Lake Erie increased to peak values in […]

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NSF Study: Climate and Agricultural Practices May Contribute to Increase of HABS in Lake Erie

According to a new multi-investigator study, with contributions from researchers funded by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science’s (NCCOS) Ecological Forecasting Program in Lake Erie, the record-breaking 2011 Lake Erie cyanobacteria bloom was likely caused by a combination of changing farming practices and weather conditions; conditions predicted to continue under a changing climate. The study led […]

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Lake Erie Nutrient Management Priorities Set at International Workshop

Don Scavia, a researcher whose work is funded in part by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, presented results from his Lake Erie hypoxia ecological forecasting project. His presentation focused on phosphorus loading, climate influence on those loads, subsequent impacts on dissolved oxygen and harmful algal blooms, and best management practices to control nutrient runoff. Despite […]

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Excess Algae Responsible for Hotspots of Increased Ocean Acidification

A research paper published this week reveals that large die-offs of algae locally magnify ocean acidification. As the cells die and sinks to the bottom, the bacteria population that feeds on them swells in response, consuming more oxygen and releasing more carbon dioxide (CO2). The CO2 reacts in seawater to form acidic compounds that lower […]

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“New” CO2 Source Spells Trouble for Marine Life | Mother Jones

A new kind of witchy interaction is underway in the oceans, report the authors of a new paper in Environmental Science & Technology. William G. Sunda and Wei-Jun Cai created a model to predict how CO2 from water pollution—that is, runoff from chemical fertilizers (farms), human waste (sewage), and animal waste (feedlots, ranches), plus nitrogen […]

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Scientist warns of heavier storms, more algae – WSJ.com

An increasingly warm climate is worsening the problem of harmful Great Lakes algae blooms by boosting the intensity of spring rains that wash phosphorus into the waters, a scientist said Wednesday during a conference for advocates and policymakers. The trend is likely to continue over the coming century, heightening the urgency to control runoff of […]

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As Carbon Dioxide Changes the Sea, Shellfish Biologists Work to Adapt

To anyone who has spent a languid summer afternoon tumbling in the waves on South Beach or watched the earth’s closest star dip into the horizon at Menemsha, the ocean can seem eternal and unchanging. But scientists are increasingly discovering that human activity is transforming what was once thought to be an invulnerable resource. The […]

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Toxic Algae Not New to Puget Sound, Favor Rising Temperatures

University and NOAA investigators have found seed-like cysts of the toxic alga Alexandrium at all depths in a sediment core taken from Sequim Bay in Puget Sound. The depths in which they found the seeds indicate Alexandrium dates back to the late 1800’s. Correlations between cyst abundance, sea surface temperature, air temperature, and, for a shorter […]

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