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Marsh Hydrology Model Supports Hurricane Sandy Restoration

In support of restoration and resilience of marshes impacted by Hurricane Sandy, the U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) chose an NCCOS-supported forecast model to predict marsh ecology and hydrology related to combined effects from storm surge and sea level rise. The model selected was developed as part of the NCCOS sponsored Ecological Effects of Sea […]

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How Climate Change Could Impact Harmful Algal Blooms

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are projected to increase as sea surface temperatures rise and ocean acidification continues according to Dr. Alan Lewitus, of NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. His findings were shared during a symposium at George Mason University in October which covered such topics as climate change and extreme weather effects on […]

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Puget Sound Stakeholders See Value in HAB Forecasts

At a June 26 meeting, NCCOS-funded ECOHAB project investigators concluded that climate change could increase the window of opportunity for blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Alexandrium catenella to occur. In light of this information, state officials expressed strong interest in seasonal HAB forecasts, while industry and local managers requested daily to weekly forecasts. Although future climate change will […]

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Study Describes Social-ecological System of La Parguera, Puerto Rico

A new study describes the social-ecological system of La Parguera, Puerto Rico, and identifies the different pressures that have changed this system over the last 40 years. According to the report, multiple pressures have changed this ecosystem, including: sedimentation, nutrient enrichment, elevated seawater temperatures, and overfishing. La Parguera is a small fishing village on the […]

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Spring Flood Outlook Has Implications for Gulf of Mexico and Chesapeake Bay Hypoxia

The NOAA 2014 U.S. Spring Flood Risk Assessment provides an important first look at some of the factors that influence summer hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) in the Gulf of Mexico and the Chesapeake Bay. This year’s predicted elevated flood risk in the Upper Midwest and the Ohio River Valley may result in a larger hypoxic […]

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Chesapeake Bay Dead Zones Show Marine Worm Species Shifts

A recent NCCOS-sponsored study conducted by the University of Maryland’s Center for Environmental Science has found a hypoxia-induced shift in marine worm communities in Chesapeake Bay to ones made up of species that are extremely adaptable to stressful conditions like hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen). The team also found that the magnitude of the marine worm […]

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Climate-based Integrated Ecosystem Assessments for Ocean Resource Management

A special issue of the journal Oceanography published in March highlights a number of accomplishments and findings of the U.S. component of the Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics (GLOBEC) program. For over 20 years, this multidisciplinary research program initiated by the United Nations conducted research in the U.S. and around the world, focusing on the potential […]

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Evidence of Climate-related Algal Community Shifts off North Carolina

At least seven species of marine algae previously restricted to more tropical waters have expanded their range northward to the temperate reefs off North Carolina. Reports of seven other new algae species are under investigation to determine if they also represent a tropical shift in North Carolina’s algal flora. Researchers from the National Centers for […]

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