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‘Most Notable Paper’ Awarded to NCCOS Project

A team of researchers funded by NCCOS recently won the 2015 Chandler-Misener Award for the most notable paper published in the Journal of Great Lakes Research (JGLR). The paper, “Assessing and addressing the re-eutrophication of Lake Erie: Central basin hypoxia,” synthesizes results from a long-term NCCOS project examining the causes and consequences of hypoxia (low oxygen) […]

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Regional Water Management Practices Reduce Biscayne Bay Submerged Aquatic Vegetation

In subtropical Biscayne Bay, Florida, NCCOS research reveals decades of water management practices reduce freshwater flow, negatively impacting abundance and composition of the bay’s nearshore submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) communities, fish, and crustaceans. Over the last 50 years, a massive water management system modified the hydrology of the South Florida watershed by altering the quantity, […]

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Upwelling Controls HAB Movement toward Pacific NW Coast

Models developed by NCCOS-sponsored researchers will predict the transport of harmful algal blooms (HABs) to coastal beaches or offshore from two locations off of Washington and Oregon, based on the influence of the Columbia River Plume and seasonal upwelling (displacement of surface water by cool, nutrient rich, deep water). A recent study determined that upwelling plays […]

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Primary Cause of Dead Zones is Biological on Pacific Northwest Continental Shelves

Coastal waters of the northern portion of the California Current System experience a seasonal decline in oxygen concentrations and increasing hypoxia (dead zones) over the summer upwelling season resulting in negative impacts to many organisms. NCCOS-sponsored research modelling determined that plankton respiration was the leading influence on seasonal and interannual fluctuations in oxygen concentration and hypoxia in the […]

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Pulley Ridge Corals Show Potential Signs of Recovery After 10-Year Decline

An NCCOS-funded study has produced a detailed characterization of the deep (60–80 meters), mesophotic reefs and fish populations of Pulley Ridge, located off the southwest coast of Florida. While the study shows a decade-long decrease in coral cover at Pulley Ridge, when compared with data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in 2003, the findings […]

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Marsh Hydrology Model Supports Hurricane Sandy Restoration

In support of restoration and resilience of marshes impacted by Hurricane Sandy, the U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) chose an NCCOS-supported forecast model to predict marsh ecology and hydrology related to combined effects from storm surge and sea level rise. The model selected was developed as part of the NCCOS sponsored Ecological Effects of Sea […]

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How Climate Change Could Impact Harmful Algal Blooms

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are projected to increase as sea surface temperatures rise and ocean acidification continues according to Dr. Alan Lewitus, of NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. His findings were shared during a symposium at George Mason University in October which covered such topics as climate change and extreme weather effects on […]

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Puget Sound Stakeholders See Value in HAB Forecasts

At a June 26 meeting, NCCOS-funded ECOHAB project investigators concluded that climate change could increase the window of opportunity for blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Alexandrium catenella to occur. In light of this information, state officials expressed strong interest in seasonal HAB forecasts, while industry and local managers requested daily to weekly forecasts. Although future climate change will […]

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