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Association of Marine Lab Conference Features Caribbean Ciguatera Research

To raise awareness about a resurgence of Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) in the Caribbean and the current state of ciguatera research, NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) led a special session on ciguatera at the Association of Marine Laboratories of the Caribbean 37th Scientific Conference in Willemstad, Curaçao, during the week of May […]

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Oceanic Continental Margin Dead Zones Emerge as Threats to Coastal Waters

Declines in oxygen levels of coastal waters have accelerated in recent decades creating “dead zones” not only in more publicized nearshore areas but in open ocean offshore regions of the continental shelves and slopes. Once treated as separate phenomena and distinct fields of study, scientists now see offshore and coastal hypoxia as interconnected, resulting in […]

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Sea Star Wasting Disease Discovered in Alaska

Researchers from NCCOS and the University of Alaska Fairbanks School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences found evidence of sea star wasting disease in Alaska while surveying intertidal areas near NOAA’s Kasitsna Bay Laboratory. The team found the diseased sea stars during long-term monitoring surveys conducted under the Gulf Watch Alaska program at sites around Elephant […]

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‘Most Notable Paper’ Awarded to NCCOS Project

A team of researchers funded by NCCOS recently won the 2015 Chandler-Misener Award for the most notable paper published in the Journal of Great Lakes Research (JGLR). The paper, “Assessing and addressing the re-eutrophication of Lake Erie: Central basin hypoxia,” synthesizes results from a long-term NCCOS project examining the causes and consequences of hypoxia (low oxygen) […]

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Regional Water Management Practices Reduce Biscayne Bay Submerged Aquatic Vegetation

In subtropical Biscayne Bay, Florida, NCCOS research reveals decades of water management practices reduce freshwater flow, negatively impacting abundance and composition of the bay’s nearshore submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) communities, fish, and crustaceans. Over the last 50 years, a massive water management system modified the hydrology of the South Florida watershed by altering the quantity, […]

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Upwelling Controls HAB Movement toward Pacific NW Coast

Models developed by NCCOS-sponsored researchers will predict the transport of harmful algal blooms (HABs) to coastal beaches or offshore from two locations off of Washington and Oregon, based on the influence of the Columbia River Plume and seasonal upwelling (displacement of surface water by cool, nutrient rich, deep water). A recent study determined that upwelling plays […]

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Primary Cause of Dead Zones is Biological on Pacific Northwest Continental Shelves

Coastal waters of the northern portion of the California Current System experience a seasonal decline in oxygen concentrations and increasing hypoxia (dead zones) over the summer upwelling season resulting in negative impacts to many organisms. NCCOS-sponsored research modelling determined that plankton respiration was the leading influence on seasonal and interannual fluctuations in oxygen concentration and hypoxia in the […]

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Pulley Ridge Corals Show Potential Signs of Recovery After 10-Year Decline

An NCCOS-funded study has produced a detailed characterization of the deep (60–80 meters), mesophotic reefs and fish populations of Pulley Ridge, located off the southwest coast of Florida. While the study shows a decade-long decrease in coral cover at Pulley Ridge, when compared with data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in 2003, the findings […]

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