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Support Grows for Living Shorelines in North Carolina

In recent decades, increased development along our nation’s estuarine shorelines has led to shoreline hardening as landowners attempt to protect their properties from coastal erosion. Estuarine shorelines are a transition zone between open water and upland regions and provide a variety of ecosystem services, including essential habitat to commercially and ecologically important species, buffering storm-driven […]

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Storm Surge and Sea Level Rise Models Improved by Innovative Measurement of Coastal Marsh Elevation

Coastal marsh elevation, a measurement used in models to predict impacts of sea level rise and periodic flooding from storm surge, is commonly determined by remote sensing methods that have been found to overestimate marsh platform height. In order to address this inaccuracy, known as a “saturation problem” caused by dense vegetation, NOAA’s National Centers of […]

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U.S. Department of Transportation Updates Coastal Infrastructure Risk Assessment Using NCCOS Research

Modeling concepts developed by the NCCOS sponsored Gulf of Mexico Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise (EESLR) project are being used by the U. S. Department of Transportation (DOT) as a case study in the latest DOT hydraulic engineering manual. The manual, “Highways in the Coastal Environment: Assessing Extreme Events,” provides technical guidance and methods […]

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Sea Level Rise Visualization Tool “Tells Story” of Climate Change

NCCOS sponsored researchers at the University of Central Florida (UCF) are developing an improved web-based interactive sea level rise viewer. Interactive sea level rise viewers (ISLRVs) are map-based visualization tools that communicate the impacts of climate change-related sea level rise (SLR), associated with increased flooding, coastal erosion, storm surge damage, and saltwater intrusion. Traditional story telling uses the printed word […]

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Marsh Hydrology Model Supports Hurricane Sandy Restoration

In support of restoration and resilience of marshes impacted by Hurricane Sandy, the U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) chose an NCCOS-supported forecast model to predict marsh ecology and hydrology related to combined effects from storm surge and sea level rise. The model selected was developed as part of the NCCOS sponsored Ecological Effects of Sea […]

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Sea Level Rise Scenario Project Wins Advanced Computing Award

The Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) group awarded $56,000 to an NCCOS-sponsored project that is integrating models to assess the ecological impacts of sea level rise. XSEDE selected the project to facilitate modeling sea level rise and storm surge simulations in the Gulf of Mexico. XSEDE, a National Science Foundation initiative, boasts the most […]

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Incorporating Shoreline Fluctuations into Tidal Models Improves Sea Level Predictions

Research sponsored by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science demonstrates the importance of incorporating dynamic shoreline changes into models over time to forecast sea level change impacts. Projected sea level change impacts are often depicted by assuming coastlines migrate unaltered over time with the rising or falling sea level. While valid for hard, rocky shorelines, […]

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NCCOS and Partners Explore Climate-Related Thresholds and Tipping Points

Stakeholders expressed concerns related to climate thresholds and tipping points for coastal systems through a workshop held at the Hollings Marine Lab August 18-19, 2014. Representatives from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, other National Ocean Service (NOS) offices, coastal management groups, and academia discussed the application of tipping point concepts for coastal managers, and associated […]

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