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Connecting with Local Communities to Document Sea Level Rise in North Carolina

A NCCOS project to understand and predict changes in North Carolina coastal marshes, and their capacity to protect shorelines from the combined impacts of sea-level rise, tides, and storm surge partnered with the NOAA North Carolina Sentinel Site Cooperative. Project leader, Dr. Christine Voss (University of North Carolina Institute of Marine Sciences), combines research results […]

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NOS and NCCOS Leadership Experience Beaufort Lab Science

Last month, the NOAA Beaufort Lab received two high level visitors: David Holst, the Acting Deputy Assistant Administrator of NOS, and Mary Erickson, the Director of NCCOS. The NOAA campus in Beaufort, North Carolina houses researchers from the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOS’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, and the North Carolina Coastal Reserve and […]

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Blue Carbon Potential of Living Shorelines

A recent NOAA study shows Living Shorelines are not only an excellent method of erosion control for coastal properties but also sequester carbon which increases coastal resilience. Living shorelines are a green infrastructure technique of incorporating native vegetation alone or in combination with offshore sills to stabilize the shoreline. Continued use of the living shoreline […]

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National Coastal Ocean and Estuary Conference Provides Platform for NCCOS Research

The 23rd biennial Coasatal and Estuarine Research Federation Conference (CERF), held in Portland, Oregon this November, highlighted the scope of research sponsored by NCCOS including harmful algae and their toxins and ocean acidification and hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) interactions. NCCOS exclusively hosted a major session and co-hosted a second major session with the NOAA Office of Oceanic […]

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NCCOS Delivers Hard Truths on Hardened Shorelines in the Mid-Atlantic

NCCOS-sponsored researchers have found that hardened shorelines have negative effects on fish; invertebrates, such as oysters and crabs; and submerged aquatic vegetation. Shoreline hardening is an attempt to stabilize coastal land and protect residential and commercial infrastructure along the coast by building structures, like seawalls, to hold back the sea and prevent the loss of sediment. […]

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NOAA Releases Guidance for the Use of Living Shorelines

NOAA released Guidance for Considering the Use of Living Shorelines today. This Guidance was developed in an agency wide effort to clarify NOAA’s encouragement for the use of living shorelines as a shoreline stabilization technique along sheltered coasts. Living shorelines can preserve and improve habitats and their ecosystem services at the land-water interface. Although erosion is […]

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Dolphin Entanglements Follow Historic 1,000 Year Rainfall in South Carolina

From October 1 through October 5, 2015 South Carolina experienced a catastrophic rainfall event that produced over 24 inches of rain in some areas from Columbia to Charleston. On October 8 a dolphin was found alive entangled in a crab pot line on the south side of Charleston Harbor where the Ashley River discharges. A […]

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Sea Level Rise Shoreline Model Reconstructs Past to Predict Future

A unique NCCOS sponsored study, recently published in Contenental Shelf Research, examined the influence of sea level rise (SLR) on historic mainland and barrier island beaches and salt marshes of Mississippi’s Grand Bay in Mississippi Sound. The research used historical data to investigate how excess erosion in Grand Bay and SLR will affect any future changes […]

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