You are here: Home / News / Climate Impacts / Archive by category "Ocean Acidification" (Page 2)

News and Features by Research Area or Topic

Environmental Conditions Can Influence Development of Dermo Disease in Oysters

A recent NCCOS-sponsored study by the Smithsonian Institution showed that long-term exposure to daily fluctuations of hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) increased Dermo disease (Perkinsus marinus) infection in previously uninfected eastern oysters. Surprisingly, daily-cycling pH (a measure of acidity) did not affect Dermo disease infection levels in conjunction with daily-cycling hypoxia or with continuous normal oxygen […]

Continue reading

Ocean Sciences Meeting Highlights Results of Sponsored Research

The 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting showcased the reach and extent of research sponsored by NCCOS, including coral reefs, harmful algal blooms, hypoxia, applying research to management solutions, and integrated ecosystem assessments. NCCOS staff and sponsored research scientists gave over 25 oral and poster presentations and co-chaired a special session on mapping, monitoring, and managing mesophotic […]

Continue reading

Tackling Ocean Acidification in Maine

Ocean chemistry is rapidly changing due to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, which has increased the acidity of seawater worldwide. Ocean acidification can affect marine resources such as fish and shellfish and may be particularly acute in Gulf of Maine waters because low temperatures and runoff from the land can exacerbate acidic conditions. On […]

Continue reading

Ocean Acidification Promotes Disruptive and Harmful Algal Blooms on Our Coasts

The general decline in ocean pH (i.e., more acidic conditions) from the increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) is well documented. Also well documented are increased nutrients entering coastal waters often promoting excessive and ecosystem disruptive algae blooms, including harmful algal blooms. The decay of these coastal blooms promotes bacterial respiration resulting in increased CO2, […]

Continue reading

NCCOS Research in Today’s Rapidly Changing Global Environment

Two national science conferences recently highlighted NCCOS research: The theme at the 7th Symposium on Harmful Algae in the United States (Oct. 27–31, 2013; Sarasota, FL) was harmful algal blooms (HABs) in a changing world, especially a more acidic one. NCCOS HAB scientists and sponsored researchers  organized, advised,  chaired sessions, and presented some 13 oral […]

Continue reading

NCCOS Expertise Contributes to U.S. National Climate Assessment

Four NCCOS scientists wrote a NOAA technical report on “Oceans and Marine Resources in a Changing Climate” that led to a chapter in the Third National Climate Assessment (2013), produced by the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Carol Auer, Quay Dortch, Elizabeth Jewett, and Cary Lopez participated in this comprehensive review, wherein 63 experts examined […]

Continue reading

Interagency Working Group Aims for Better Collaboration on Understanding How Nitrogen Pollution is Linked to Climate Issues

The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) recently convened a federal working group to address the linkages between climate and nitrogen pollution in the environment.  The goal of the group is to leverage and coordinate federal (NOAA, EPA, USGS, USDA, DOE, NSF) intramural and extramural research activities to enhance the knowledge base on this issue. […]

Continue reading

Zooplankton Show Ability to Adapt to Stress of Starvation and Climate Change

NCCOS sponsored research on zooplankton response to Harmful Algal Blooms has also yielded information on how zooplankton respond to climate change and environmental stress. Zooplankton play a central role in food webs from phytoplankton to fish and are also important in the biogeochemical cycles of lakes and oceans. Two recent studies from Dr. Hans Dam […]

Continue reading