You are here: Home / News / Climate Impacts / Archive by category "Ocean Acidification"

News and Features by Research Area or Topic

Coastal Ocean Acidification: The Other Eutrophication Problem

Eutrophication, or increased nutrient loading to estuaries, causes algae to bloom and consequently coastal hypoxia (low oxygen waters) when the algal biomass decomposes. Often overlooked, eutrophication can also produce carbon dioxide, which leads to a lowering of seawater pH (or increasing acidity). A recent invited paper by scientists supported by NCCOS and the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program shows low […]

Continue reading

Declining Oxygen Levels Threaten Oysters in Chesapeake Bay

NCCOS-sponsored research by the Smithsonian Institution Environmental Research Center (SERC) reveals low dissolved oxygen (hypoxia) hampers oysters’ ability to fight Dermo, a disease that has ravaged oysters throughout the Chesapeake Bay, resulting in up to two to three times more infected oysters than in waters with normal oxygen levels. Hypoxia is commonly studied on large geographic […]

Continue reading

Lecture Informs Public of Long Island’s Coastal Ills, Solutions

NCCOS-funded researcher Dr. Christopher Gobler and his students recently reported on the nearly complete collapse of hard clam fisheries in Great South Bay and bay scallop fisheries off the East End of Long Island due to annually occurring harmful algal blooms, hypoxia, and acidification. The team discovered excess nitrogen entering groundwater from septic tanks and […]

Continue reading

Some Coastal Fish May be Able to Adapt to an Acidifying Environment

A new study shows that some coastal fish may be able to condition their offspring to tolerate seasonally acidifying environments, a result never shown before in wild fish populations. Researchers funded by NCCOS and NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program sampled a wild, spawning population of Atlantic silversides, then combined this information with carbon dioxide exposure experiments […]

Continue reading

Marine Shellfish Get a ‘One-Two Punch’ from Acidification and Low Oxygen

Recent research has shown that ocean acidification and low oxygen interact to harm early life stages of bay scallops (Argopecten irradians) and hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria). The study, conducted by Stony Brook University and sponsored by NCCOS and NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program, found that the combined effects of low pH (high acidity) and low oxygen […]

Continue reading

Environmental Conditions Can Influence Development of Dermo Disease in Oysters

A recent NCCOS-sponsored study by the Smithsonian Institution showed that long-term exposure to daily fluctuations of hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) increased Dermo disease (Perkinsus marinus) infection in previously uninfected eastern oysters. Surprisingly, daily-cycling pH (a measure of acidity) did not affect Dermo disease infection levels in conjunction with daily-cycling hypoxia or with continuous normal oxygen […]

Continue reading

Ocean Sciences Meeting Highlights Results of Sponsored Research

The 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting showcased the reach and extent of research sponsored by NCCOS, including coral reefs, harmful algal blooms, hypoxia, applying research to management solutions, and integrated ecosystem assessments. NCCOS staff and sponsored research scientists gave over 25 oral and poster presentations and co-chaired a special session on mapping, monitoring, and managing mesophotic […]

Continue reading

Tackling Ocean Acidification in Maine

Ocean chemistry is rapidly changing due to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, which has increased the acidity of seawater worldwide. Ocean acidification can affect marine resources such as fish and shellfish and may be particularly acute in Gulf of Maine waters because low temperatures and runoff from the land can exacerbate acidic conditions. On […]

Continue reading