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NCCOS Completes Ecosystem Assessment of Chesapeake Bay Watersheds

NCCOS recently completed an assessment of three watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay region (Corsica, Magothy, and Rhode Rivers), exploring the linkages between dominant land-use type (agriculture, residential, and mixed-use, respectively) and aquatic ecosystem health. Habitat health was determined based on factors of water quality including dissolved oxygen, nitrogen, and phosphorous concentrations, and aquatic organism health […]

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Phytoplankton Monitoring Network Volunteers in Georgia Trained in Marine Debris Reporting

The NCCOS Phytoplankton Monitoring Network (PMN) program recently trained volunteers from Georgia in harmful algal bloom and marine debris monitoring. Volunteers from Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary, Burton 4-H, and the University of Georgia’s Marine Extension Service received instruction on target phytoplankton species for change detection, as well as how to identify microplastics in phytoplankton […]

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Sea Level Rise Scenario Project Wins Advanced Computing Award

The Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) group awarded $56,000 to an NCCOS-sponsored project that is integrating models to assess the ecological impacts of sea level rise. XSEDE selected the project to facilitate modeling sea level rise and storm surge simulations in the Gulf of Mexico. XSEDE, a National Science Foundation initiative, boasts the most […]

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Incorporating Shoreline Fluctuations into Tidal Models Improves Sea Level Predictions

Research sponsored by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science demonstrates the importance of incorporating dynamic shoreline changes into models over time to forecast sea level change impacts. Projected sea level change impacts are often depicted by assuming coastlines migrate unaltered over time with the rising or falling sea level. While valid for hard, rocky shorelines, […]

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NCCOS and Partners Explore Climate-Related Thresholds and Tipping Points

Stakeholders expressed concerns related to climate thresholds and tipping points for coastal systems through a workshop held at the Hollings Marine Lab August 18-19, 2014. Representatives from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, other National Ocean Service (NOS) offices, coastal management groups, and academia discussed the application of tipping point concepts for coastal managers, and associated […]

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Atlantic Ocean Temperature Rise Could Favor Range Expansion of Invasive Lionfish and Native Species

Warming ocean temperatures could favor the expansion of the invasive Indo-Pacific Lionfish and native tropical species distributions within the Atlantic according to a recent study conducted by researchers from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of North Carolina, Wilmington. The study was conducted from 2006–2010 in temperate rocky […]

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New Research Funding Opportunities Available for 2015

The National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science’s (NCCOS) Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research (CSCOR) has released three competitive Federal Funding Opportunities for the 2015 Fiscal Year beginning October 1, 2014. The competitive Federal Funding Announcements of Opportunity (FFOs), published in Grants.gov, are: 2015 Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise Program 2015 Northern Gulf of […]

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Coastal Ocean Acidification: The Other Eutrophication Problem

Eutrophication, or increased nutrient loading to estuaries, causes algae to bloom and consequently coastal hypoxia (low oxygen waters) when the algal biomass decomposes. Often overlooked, eutrophication can also produce carbon dioxide, which leads to a lowering of seawater pH (or increasing acidity). A recent invited paper by scientists supported by NCCOS and the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program shows low […]

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