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Sea Star Wasting Disease Discovered in Alaska

Researchers from NCCOS and the University of Alaska Fairbanks School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences found evidence of sea star wasting disease in Alaska while surveying intertidal areas near NOAA’s Kasitsna Bay Laboratory. The team found the diseased sea stars during long-term monitoring surveys conducted under the Gulf Watch Alaska program at sites around Elephant […]

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‘Most Notable Paper’ Awarded to NCCOS Project

A team of researchers funded by NCCOS recently won the 2015 Chandler-Misener Award for the most notable paper published in the Journal of Great Lakes Research (JGLR). The paper, “Assessing and addressing the re-eutrophication of Lake Erie: Central basin hypoxia,” synthesizes results from a long-term NCCOS project examining the causes and consequences of hypoxia (low oxygen) […]

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Model Allows Scallop Industry to Plan for Impacts of Climate Change

NCCOS-sponsored researchers have developed a user-friendly computer program to help manage the U.S. commercial Atlantic sea scallop fishery, which is threatened by progressively higher temperatures and ocean acidification. The Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) concurrently simulates ocean conditions related to temperature and ocean acidification, sea scallop population dynamics, and economic impacts on the scallop fishery. In the […]

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Support Grows for Living Shorelines in North Carolina

In recent decades, increased development along our nation’s estuarine shorelines has led to shoreline hardening as landowners attempt to protect their properties from coastal erosion. Estuarine shorelines are a transition zone between open water and upland regions and provide a variety of ecosystem services, including essential habitat to commercially and ecologically important species, buffering storm-driven […]

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Regional Water Management Practices Reduce Biscayne Bay Submerged Aquatic Vegetation

In subtropical Biscayne Bay, Florida, NCCOS research reveals decades of water management practices reduce freshwater flow, negatively impacting abundance and composition of the bay’s nearshore submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) communities, fish, and crustaceans. Over the last 50 years, a massive water management system modified the hydrology of the South Florida watershed by altering the quantity, […]

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Storm Surge and Sea Level Rise Models Improved by Innovative Measurement of Coastal Marsh Elevation

Coastal marsh elevation, a measurement used in models to predict impacts of sea level rise and periodic flooding from storm surge, is commonly determined by remote sensing methods that have been found to overestimate marsh platform height. In order to address this inaccuracy, known as a “saturation problem” caused by dense vegetation, NOAA’s National Centers of […]

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NCCOS Collaboration Explores Previously Unmapped Seafloor Habitats of the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

Well over 50 percent of the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary seafloor has yet to be mapped or characterized at a level suitable for resource management. Recently on board the NOAA ship Bell M. Shimada, NCCOS and partners worked to reduce that number. On this mission, 82 square miles were mapped and identified as priority […]

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Research Cruise Investigates Ocean Acidification Effects on Deep Sea Coral

NCCOS, collaborating with NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Office of Ocean Exploration Research, and Office of Coast Survey, embarked on the NOAA ship Bell M Shimada on March 13 in the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary (CINMS), conducting ROV surveys to characterize unexplored habitat and assess abundance and condition of deep sea corals in the face of climate […]

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