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News and Features by Region Texas Archives - News and Features

NCCOS Transfers Tools and Techniques to Environmental Cooperative Science Center

Last month, NCCOS scientists led workshops designed to transfer to NOAA’s Environmental Cooperative Science Center (ECSC) protocols and analyses used by NCCOS scientists to assess ecosystem health. The workshops focused on using indicators of organismal well-being to estimate population-level health, habitat quality, and ecosystem change in response to environmental factors. Approximately 30 ECSC graduate students […]

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Automated Sensor Provides Texas with Early Warning of Red Tide

Last week, an NCCOS-funded sensor installed on a Port Aransas pier alerted Texas agencies to rising concentrations of Karenia brevis, the marine dinoflagellate that causes red tides. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, the Texas Department of State Health Services, and other interested managers received a two-week early warning that a red tide bloom was […]

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Next-generation HAB Detectors are Smaller, Cheaper, and Getting Attention

Two instruments developed with NCCOS support are revolutionizing the detection of harmful algal blooms (HABs). The Environmental Sample Processor, or ESP, and the Imaging Flow Cytobot, or IFCB, are receiving more attention from scientists and managers and are the focus of an August 2014 article in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. The article describes the […]

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Red Tide Toxin Metabolite Accumulates in Organs, May Pose Greater Risk to Shellfish Consumers

In 2012, the state of Texas experienced the longest red tide on record, leading to a collapse of its oyster industry. Red tides in the Gulf of Mexico affect humans, wildlife, fisheries, and the regional tourist-related economy. They are caused by the harmful algae Karenia brevis, which release a neurotoxin called brevetoxin that accumulates in exposed shellfish and […]

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Average 2014 Gulf of Mexico ‘Dead Zone’ Confirms NOAA-supported Forecast

National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science supported scientists documented that the 2014 “dead zone” (area of hypoxia, or low oxygen) in the northern Gulf of Mexico west of the Mississippi River delta now covers 5,052 square miles of sea floor, or about the size of the state of Connecticut. Though average in size and smaller than last year, […]

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NOAA, Partners Issue Dead Zone Predictions for Gulf of Mexico and Chesapeake Bay

Scientists are expecting an average, but still large, hypoxic or “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico this year, and a slightly above-average hypoxic zone in the Chesapeake Bay. NOAA-supported modeling is forecasting this year’s Gulf of Mexico hypoxic (very low oxygen) zone to cover an area ranging from 4,633 to 5,708 square miles (12,000 […]

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Marine Life in Gulf of Mexico Face Multiple Challenges

By Maggie Broadwater, Guest Blogger from NOAA’s Harmful Algal Bloom Analytical Response Team. Animals living in coastal waters can face a number of environmental stressors—both from nature and from humans—which, in turn, may have compounding effects. This may be the case for marine life in the Gulf of Mexico which experiences both oil spills and the […]

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Texas Alerted to Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia Bloom in Galveston Bay

Volunteers with NOAA’s Phytoplankton Monitoring Network have reported a bloom of the diatom, Pseudo-nitzschia in Galveston Bay, Texas, and NOAA’s Analytical Response Team has confirmed that the bloom is producing domoic acid, a neurotoxin that can cause amnesiac shellfish poisoning. State managers of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas Department of State Health […]

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