You are here: Home / News /

News and Features by Region Massachusetts Archives - News and Features

NCCOS Prepares Toxin Sensor for Gulf of Maine Red Tide Forecasting

An NCCOS technical expert completed critical calibrations of the paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxin sensor for an Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) platform stationed at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Laboratory for Ocean Sensors and Observing Systems (LOSOS). Beginning in early May, this ESP will perform autonomous, near real-time monitoring of toxins associated with cells of the red […]

Continue reading

Marsh Hydrology Model Supports Hurricane Sandy Restoration

In support of restoration and resilience of marshes impacted by Hurricane Sandy, the U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) chose an NCCOS-supported forecast model to predict marsh ecology and hydrology related to combined effects from storm surge and sea level rise. The model selected was developed as part of the NCCOS sponsored Ecological Effects of Sea […]

Continue reading

Tenacity of Brown Tides Linked to Genetic Flexibility

The genetic flexibility of Aureococcus anophagefferens, the harmful alga responsible for “brown tides” off Long Island, allows it to thrive in conditions other algae cannot tolerate. NCCOS-sponsored scientists assessed this alga’s response to environmental stressors, such as low nutrients and low light, by looking at pieces of its RNA, which tell Aureococcus which proteins to […]

Continue reading

Gulf of Maine Red Tide Forecast Suggests Modest Bloom: Robotic Sensors Deployed to Confirm and Improve Future Predictions

A team of NOAA and academic researchers led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has issued a seasonal red tide forecast for the Gulf of Maine as part of a pilot program that expands NOAA harmful algal bloom (HAB) forecasting to this region. The forecast suggests a modest bloom for the upcoming 2014 season. […]

Continue reading

Programmed Cell Death and the Decline of Harmful Algal Blooms

Programmed cell death, or self-induced cell mortality, is the subject of increasing attention and research efforts. All phytoplankton blooms decline for a variety of reasons—nutrient depletion, zooplankton grazing, virus infections, sedimentation—but programmed cell death as a means to bloom termination is a new concept, and one not well understood. Dr. Deana Erdner, an NCCOS-sponsored researcher […]

Continue reading

New Research in the Gulf of Maine Improves Red Tide Forecasting

Scientists from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science recently teamed with sponsored partners to collect sediment samples in the Gulf of Maine needed to find cysts of the harmful algae Alexandrium fundyense. The data collection took place on Nov. 6–11 aboard NOAA’s research ship Okeanos Explorer—the first time a NOAA ship has been used […]

Continue reading

Gordon Research Conference Highlights NCCOS Expertise in Harmful Algae Research

At the June 16-21, Mycotoxins & Phycotoxins Gordon Research Conference, NCCOS-sponsored researchers and agency scientists led sessions, gave presentations, and provided expert discussions on algal and cyanobacterial blooms and their toxins that adversely affect humans and wildlife. NCCOS’s Dr. Quay Dortch co-chaired a session entitled “Strategies and Regulation for Prevention and Control” that highlighted strategies and projects […]

Continue reading

NOAA North Atlantic Region Collaborates on Ecological Forecasting

On May 2, 2013, NOAA’s North Atlantic Regional Collaboration Team convened a workshop at the Cooperative Institute for the North Atlantic Region in Woods Hole, MA to explore regional capabilities and needs for ecological forecasting. Long-term science support from NOS’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science has led to a Harmful Algal Bloom forecast currently […]

Continue reading