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NOAA and Partners Monitor Large Red Tide in Gulf of Mexico off Southwest Florida

A large harmful algal bloom (HAB) of the Florida red tide organism Karenia brevis remains offshore of Florida’s southwest coastal counties, causing growing concern among Florida wildlife managers and public health officials. Depending on the winds and currents, the HAB could possibly reach some of Florida’s most popular tourist beaches within a week. The bloom caused an on-going […]

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NOAA Expedition Embarks to Investigate Coral Ecosystem Connectivity in the Gulf of Mexico

A NOAA-funded investigation of the relatively healthy, deep, mesophotic reefs of Pulley Ridge (off the southwest coast of Florida) begins the second leg of this summer’s expedition. From August 14-28, the University of Miami’s R/V F.G. Walton Smith will launch a surface driven remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to photograph the benthic and fish communities, as […]

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NCCOS Assists Southwest Alaskan Coastal Resource Management

Scientists from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science traveled to King Salmon, Naknek, and Dillingham, Alaska  from July 17-31, collecting sediments for  toxicity testing, fish  tissues to identify irregularities, and samples of benthic communities, to get a baseline characterization of contaminant conditions. Samples came from the near-shore  and coastal waters of Nushagak and Kvichak Bays, both sub-estuaries of  Bristol […]

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NCCOS Promotes Shellfish Aquaculture to Improve Water Quality

Researchers are exploring the role oyster aquaculture may be playing in improving water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. On July 16, 17, and 23, 2014,  the researchers made visits to three Chesapeake Bay oyster growers to discuss their culture practices, to view their lease areas, and to share information about this joint project. The project also  involves development […]

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NOAA Forecasts and Responds to Lake Erie Harmful Algal Bloom

NOAA scientists are supporting the response to a bloom of cyanobacteria that contaminated drinking water in Lake Erie on August 2nd, leaving nearly 400,000 in Toledo, OH without drinking water for two days.  NOAA’s weekly Lake Erie Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Bulletin tracks the size and location of blooms and predicts their movement until the bloom […]

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Red Tide Toxin Metabolite Accumulates in Organs, May Pose Greater Risk to Shellfish Consumers

In 2012, the state of Texas experienced the longest red tide on record, leading to a collapse of its oyster industry. Red tides in the Gulf of Mexico affect humans, wildlife, fisheries, and the regional tourist-related economy. They are caused by the harmful algae Karenia brevis, which release a neurotoxin called brevetoxin that accumulates in exposed shellfish and […]

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The National Coral Reef Monitoring Program begins “Puerto Rico” Phase

This summer, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) researchers began collecting data on coral reefs around the island of Puerto Rico to help local natural resource managers address coral reef management concerns as part of the National Coral Reef Monitoring Program’s “Puerto Rico phase.” This program collects standardized biological, physical, and socioeconomic monitoring data […]

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Coastal Ocean Acidification: The Other Eutrophication Problem

Eutrophication, or increased nutrient loading to estuaries, causes algae to bloom and consequently coastal hypoxia (low oxygen waters) when the algal biomass decomposes. Often overlooked, eutrophication can also produce carbon dioxide, which leads to a lowering of seawater pH (or increasing acidity). A recent invited paper by scientists supported by NCCOS and the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program shows low […]

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