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Latest News and Feature Stories

Scientists Develop Accurate Seafloor Habitat Map for Puerto Rico’s Northeast Grand Reserve

NCCOS scientists recently collected marine habitat data in Puerto Rico’s Northeast Grand Reserve to validate a draft seafloor map of this land and marine protected area in northeast Puerto Rico. Using high definition, underwater video cameras, the team surveyed four hundred sites within the reserve to document reefs and other critical habitats. The researchers will combine […]

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NCCOS, Partners Explore Deep Ocean in Proposed Expansion Areas of West Coast Marine Sanctuaries

NCCOS scientists and their partners recently explored deep-water reaches in the proposed expansion areas of the Cordell Bank and the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuaries to establish a baseline understanding of new habitats and species that may soon come under sanctuary jurisdiction. Using a video camera on a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), the […]

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Automated Sensor Provides Texas with Early Warning of Red Tide

Last week, an NCCOS-funded sensor installed on a Port Aransas pier alerted Texas agencies to rising concentrations of Karenia brevis, the marine dinoflagellate that causes red tides. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, the Texas Department of State Health Services, and other interested managers received a two-week early warning that a red tide bloom was […]

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NCCOS Partners with White House to Improve Detection of Excess Nutrients in Aquatic Environments

Earlier this month, NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and other partners joined the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy in Washington, DC for a workshop to accelerate the development and adoption of nutrient sensors. Excessive amounts of nutrients (mainly nitrogen and phosphorus) entering lakes, rivers, streams, and coastal waters are causing […]

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Tenacity of Brown Tides Linked to Genetic Flexibility

The genetic flexibility of Aureococcus anophagefferens, the harmful alga responsible for “brown tides” off Long Island, allows it to thrive in conditions other algae cannot tolerate. NCCOS-sponsored scientists assessed this alga’s response to environmental stressors, such as low nutrients and low light, by looking at pieces of its RNA, which tell Aureococcus which proteins to […]

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NOAA Completes Extensive Study on Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary

A recently completed three year assessment of the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) is the first to comprehensively describe fish and benthic communities across the full depth range of the sanctuary (60-400’).  Fish and benthic community information collected by three complementary techniques were employed to collect biological information to address the potential impacts of fishing activities […]

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NOAA Facilitates Regional Consensus On Lionfish Harvesting Strategies

First reported in the 1980s, the venomous Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois miles and P. volitans) is widely established along the Southeast U.S. and Caribbean. Now invading the Gulf of Mexico and South America, estimates of lionfish densities indicate lionfish even surpassed some native species. Lionfish could permanently impact native reef fish communities, as they occupy the […]

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Incorporating Shoreline Fluctuations into Tidal Models Improves Sea Level Predictions

Research sponsored by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science demonstrates the importance of incorporating dynamic shoreline changes into models over time to forecast sea level change impacts. Projected sea level change impacts are often depicted by assuming coastlines migrate unaltered over time with the rising or falling sea level. While valid for hard, rocky shorelines, […]

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