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Algae plaguing the Indian River Lagoon was identified recently by scientists as serious trouble for fish and plants. – OrlandoSentinel.com

Scientists have preliminary confirmation that the algae clobbering vital sea grass and many kinds of popular fish in the Indian River Lagoon is a super-tiny plant with a big name that is otherwise known as “brown tide.”

The algae, Aureoumbra lagunensis, is so minuscule that billions of them can grow in every quart of lagoon water, turning the water brown and preventing sunlight from penetrating more than a few inches — essentially shading to death the eco-critical meadows of sea grass.

A team of scientists from state agencies and universities has devoted itself to unraveling the cause of this latest environmental malady for the lagoon, which extends 156 miles from New Smyrna Beach south to Jupiter and has the richest assortment of marine plants, fish and wildlife in North America. The lagoon is also one of Central Florida’s favorite playgrounds for boating and fishing.

via Algae plaguing the Indian River Lagoon was identified recently by scientists as serious trouble for fish and plants. – OrlandoSentinel.com.


See related: First Florida Brown Tide Algal Bloom in Indian River and Mosquito Lagoons Confirmed

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