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Anthropogenic Sources of Dolphin Mortality Highlighted at Southeast Regional Marine Mammal Stranding Conference

Interactions of dolphins with fishing gear and marine debris have increased over the last decade resulting in a growing number of dolphin mortality and entanglement events. Such matters were highlighted during the Southeast Regional Marine Mammal Stranding Conference held February 15-17 in Charleston, SC and co-hosted by NOS/NCCOS, NOAA Fisheries, and Coastal Carolina University.

Topics of discussion included the effects of dolphin interactions with recreational and commercial fisheries, and mitigation efforts that could reduce the risk of serious injury or death. A full day of the meeting was devoted to stranding response efforts pertaining to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, including a hands-on emergency drill.

This conference is held every two years and provides a forum for researchers to exchange information on critical environmental issues affecting the health and survival of marine mammals throughout the southeastern region of the US.

Related NCCOS Center(s):
Shorter web link for sharing: http://coastalscience.noaa.gov/news/?p=4506

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