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Recent Mussel Watch Project Findings on Persistent Organic Pollutants Shared at International Venue Will Inform Future Research and Management Efforts

As a part of their talks on persistent organic pollutants, two scientists presented National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) Mussel Watch Project data at the recent 27th annual meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, providing information that will serve to inform future research and environmental management efforts. The Mussel Watch Project is a long term coastal contaminant monitoring program that provides baseline, status, and trends data, which are useful for a number of applications, including retrospective analyses and response in areas where environmental disasters occur.

The first paper presented findings from reanalysis of Mussel Watch sediment samples archived in 1986 and recent City College of New York data which showed there may be new sources of the pesticide chlordane to the environment, and that chlordane concentrations in sediment are higher in Western Long Island Sound.

The second paper presented environmental findings following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on organic contaminants in oysters (from Mussel Watch sample data) and bacterial contamination of sediment (from National Marine Fisheries Service, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Mussel Watch data), indicating that organic contaminants in oysters decreased after the passage of the storms, and that indicator bacteria in sediments were generally equal to or below other areas of the nation subject to ocean waste disposal.

The meeting was held in Montreal, Canada, November 5-9, 2006.

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Shorter web link for sharing: http://coastalscience.noaa.gov/news/?p=944

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