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Minimal Endocrine Disruption Detected in Killifish at Selected Sites in the Chesapeake Bay

The National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science recently published the results of a study to assess endocrine disruption in Fundulus heteroclitus, a species of killifish native to the Chesapeake Bay. Plasma vitellogenin (an egg protein found in females) and related parameters in F. heteroclitus were measured at selected sites in the Chesapeake Bay. In males, vitellogenin was above the detection limit 14% of the time, and detections did not differ between sites or seasons. Significant negative correlations were found between sediment polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and GSI (gonadosomatic index), and PAHs and plasma vitellogenin in females when sampled in the spring. Overall, reproductive endocrine disruption in the killifish F. heteroclitus at the sites sampled in the Chesapeake Bay appeared somewhat minimal. The results will appear in the October 2009 issue of Marine Environmental Research. For additional information, contact Tony Pait at (301) 713-3028 x158 or Tony.Pait@noaa.gov.

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Shorter web link for sharing: http://coastalscience.noaa.gov/news/?p=1481

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