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Abstracts Sought for the 2007 Estuarine Research Federation Session, Modeling Hypoxia: Approaches and Application to Management

Abstracts are being sought for the Estuarine Research Federation (ERF) 2007 Conference Session titled Modeling Hypoxia: Approaches and Application to Management, to be held in Providence, Rhode Island from November 4-8, 2007. Detailed meeting and session information, including the abstract submittal process are available online at http://www.erf.org/. The deadline for abstracts is May 23, 2007.

The session, co-sponsored by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and the Environmental Protection Agency, will provide a forum for communication between modelers working on the problem of hypoxia in coastal ecosystems, scientists investigating ecosystem processes related to hypoxia, and managers who will ultimately base policy decisions in part on the results of model forecasts. A more detailed session description follows:

BEN.19: Modeling Hypoxia: Approaches and Application to Management
Conveners:

Eutrophication has resulted in large regions of bottom water hypoxia in coastal ecosystems around the world (e.g., northern Gulf of Mexico, Chesapeake Bay, Long Island Sound, Baltic Sea). This session provides a forum for communication between modelers working on the problem of hypoxia in coastal ecosystems, scientists investigating ecosystem processes related to hypoxia, and managers who will ultimately base policy decisions in part on the results of model forecasts.

The session will explore recent and newly developing modeling efforts that address limitations and uncertainties of past efforts (e.g., multiple nutrient limitation; spatial dynamics; seasonality; physical processes; sediment transport; recycling, transport, and fate of nutrients; benthic primary production; sediment-water nutrient exchange; organic matter diagenesis), and their application to coastal resource management.

Technical issues associated with data assimilation, nested models, and the challenges associated with the open boundary conditions will be addressed as well. (19. Benthic Ecology, Eutrophication/Water Quality, Modeling)

Related NCCOS Center(s):
Related Region(s):
Shorter web link for sharing: http://coastalscience.noaa.gov/news/?p=1232

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