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Identifying Impacts of Rising Sea Levels and Erosion to Coastal Habitats and Communities in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

Sea Level Rise (SLR) is potentially detrimental to coastal habitats and human settlements along the coast, particularly on the U.S. Gulf Coast where coastal habitats support the majority of its commercial industry.  Local resource managers must adjust their plans to protect and preserve the resources under their care. NCCOS is funding a team led by the University of Central Florida to assess the risk to coasts and coastal habitats from SLR.

The team will apply models of circulation, transport and biogeochemistry from the watershed to the sea.  Predictions of sediment loadings to the estuary and salinity transport in numerous bay systems will be used to model the evolution of intertidal marshes.

Products will include maps that delineate new tidal and habitat boundaries as a result of SLR, estimates of sediment loadings from overland runoff to estuarine systems, projections of changing salinity, marsh/shellfish habitat, land cover, and water resource impacts.

For more information, contact Carol Auer at (301) 713-3338 x164 or Carol.Auer@noaa.gov

Related NCCOS Center(s):
Shorter web link for sharing: http://coastalscience.noaa.gov/news/?p=2008

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