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Investigating Diamondback Terrapin Die-Offs in New York

From late April into May 2015 hundreds of diamondback terrapin turtles (Malaclemys terrapin)  began dying and washing up on beaches in the western part of Long Island, New York. Simultaneously an on-going Alexandrium fundyense bloom occurred. Alexandrium produces a potent neurotoxin, saxitoxin, which is the cause of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). The terrapin tissues were […]

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Scientists Expect Slightly Below Average Chesapeake Bay ‘Dead Zone’ this Summer

Low river flow and nutrient loading reason for smaller predicted size Scientists are expecting that this year’s Chesapeake Bay hypoxic low-oxygen zone, also called the “dead zone,” will be approximately 1.37 cubic miles – about the volume of 2.3 million Olympic-size swimming pools. While still large, this is 10 percent lower than the long-term average […]

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NCCOS and NMFS Partner to Survey “Unprecedented” West Coast Toxic Algal Bloom

NOAA Fisheries announced it has mobilized extra scientists to join a fisheries survey aboard the NOAA Ship Bell M. Shimada charting an extensive harmful algal bloom (HAB) that spans much of the West Coast. An NCCOS sponsored Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (ECOHAB) project in southern and central California comparing coastal HAB ‘hot spots’ analyzes water samples […]

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NOAA “Science to Management” Project Trains Stakeholders in Coral Reef Forensics

NCCOS supported researchers led a May 2015 training event wherein local community members learned to use coral reef “forensics” on reef plants and animals. This activity identified and provided early warning of coral reef stress, death and decay causes. The event, hosted by the citizen conservation group Maui Nui Marine Resource Council on the Hawaiian […]

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NOAA, partners predict an average ‘dead zone’ for Gulf of Mexico

Outlook incorporates multiple hypoxia models for first time Scientists are expecting that this year’s Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone, also called the “dead zone,” will be approximately 5,483 square miles or about the size of Connecticut–the same as it has averaged over the last several years. The dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico affects […]

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Hypoxia Leads to Pathological, but Reversible, Changes in Fish Brains

The NCCOS sponsored project, Modeling Reproductive and Population Impacts of Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico, led by the University of Texas at Austin, is investigating the impacts of low levels of dissolved oxygen on the brain functions of the Atlantic croaker, a common estuarine and coastal fish inhabiting the east coast of the United States. […]

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Association of Marine Lab Conference Features Caribbean Ciguatera Research

To raise awareness about a resurgence of Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) in the Caribbean and the current state of ciguatera research, NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) led a special session on ciguatera at the Association of Marine Laboratories of the Caribbean 37th Scientific Conference in Willemstad, Curaçao, during the week of May […]

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New Indicator for Gulf of Mexico Toxic Alga Shows Promise

NCCOS-sponsored scientists have discovered a simple indicator to predict one type of harmful algal species bloom or outbreak. The first potentially reliable biological indicator for forecasting a harmful algal bloom of the toxic dinoflagellate species Dinophysis ovum in the Gulf of Mexico is the presence of a primary food source, a small ciliate protozoan. The […]

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