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Additional Toxin Data Helped Ohio Deliver Safe Drinking Water After August Cyanobacteria Bloom

Persistent concerns about toxins in Toledo, Ohio’s drinking water following August’s large, cyanobacteria bloom in Lake Erie prompted a follow-up investigation supported by NCCOS. At the time, the bloom led the City of Toledo to issue a two-day, drinking water ban for 400,000 people in Toledo and surrounding areas after drinking water samples showed high […]

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NCCOS Embarks on Harmful Algal Cyst Sampling Cruise

Scientists from NCCOS and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution embark today aboard NOAA’s research ship, the Okeanos Explorer, on a nine-day sediment sampling mission in the Gulf of Maine. Researchers will examine sediment cores for the presence of cysts of the harmful alga Alexandrium fundyense to improve forecasting of harmful algal bloom (HAB) events along the […]

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Sea Level Rise Scenario Project Wins Advanced Computing Award

The Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) group awarded $56,000 to an NCCOS-sponsored project that is integrating models to assess the ecological impacts of sea level rise. XSEDE selected the project to facilitate modeling sea level rise and storm surge simulations in the Gulf of Mexico. XSEDE, a National Science Foundation initiative, boasts the most […]

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Automated Sensor Provides Texas with Early Warning of Red Tide

Last week, an NCCOS-funded sensor installed on a Port Aransas pier alerted Texas agencies to rising concentrations of Karenia brevis, the marine dinoflagellate that causes red tides. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, the Texas Department of State Health Services, and other interested managers received a two-week early warning that a red tide bloom was […]

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Tenacity of Brown Tides Linked to Genetic Flexibility

The genetic flexibility of Aureococcus anophagefferens, the harmful alga responsible for “brown tides” off Long Island, allows it to thrive in conditions other algae cannot tolerate. NCCOS-sponsored scientists assessed this alga’s response to environmental stressors, such as low nutrients and low light, by looking at pieces of its RNA, which tell Aureococcus which proteins to […]

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Incorporating Shoreline Fluctuations into Tidal Models Improves Sea Level Predictions

Research sponsored by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science demonstrates the importance of incorporating dynamic shoreline changes into models over time to forecast sea level change impacts. Projected sea level change impacts are often depicted by assuming coastlines migrate unaltered over time with the rising or falling sea level. While valid for hard, rocky shorelines, […]

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What Powers Florida Red Tides?

The results of a long-term research project, sponsored by NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, focused on the Gulf of Mexico red tide are featured in a special issue of the scientific journal Harmful Algae. History records blooms of the harmful Florida red tide (caused by the microalgal dinoflagellate Karenia brevis) occurring centuries before Florida’s mid-late […]

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Algal Toxins Pose Health Risk to Dogs

Harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxins, including microcystins, pose health threats and even death for dogs and other pets exposed to the contaminated water, explains a new educational brochure from the New York Sea Grant Program. The brochure, a product of a National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science sponsored research project in the Great Lakes, describes freshwater HABs and their […]

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