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NOAA Embarks on Final Expedition to Investigate Coral Ecosystem Connectivity in Gulf of Mexico

Last week, a NOAA-funded investigation of the relatively healthy deep reefs of Pulley Ridge (off the southwest coast of Florida) began its fourth and final expedition. During the two-week mission, the team will launch a remotely operated vehicle from the University of Miami’s R/V F.G. Walton Smith to photograph benthic and fish communities and collect fish […]

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Origin of Toxic Red Tides in Texas Identified

New modelling research sponsored by NCCOS shows that Texas red tides originate in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico in the Bay of Campeche. These harmful algal blooms, caused by the dinoflagellate alga Karenia brevis, result in large fish kills, human respiratory irritation, and shellfishing closures in affected areas. Unlike red tides on the west coast […]

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Hardened Shorelines Make it Hard for Submerged Aquatic Vegetation

A recent NCCOS-funded study found that shoreline hardening, particularly riprap, has a negative effect on the abundance of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). Riprap, which is made up of rocks and boulders piled along the shoreline, is commonly used to prevent shoreline erosion, but once installed, alters the natural processes and composition of the land–sea interface. The […]

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Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone Larger than Predicted After Heavy June Rains

Scientists supported by NOAA NCCOS, EPA and the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative have mapped the size of the 2015 Gulf of Mexico low-oxygen dead zone. The areal extent of hypoxia measures approximately 6,474 square miles, about the size of Connecticut and Massachusetts combined, exceeding the prediction from June. Nutrient run off from agricultural and other human […]

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NCCOS Hypoxia Forecasts Prove Accurate

For over ten years NCCOS has developed and improved hypoxia (dead zone) forecasts similar to seasonal weather forecasts. The accuracy of these forecasts is proving to be quite good. Professor Don Scavia of the University of Michigan tracks the accuracy of the NCCOS-funded annual forecasts and finds the models work well in years without hurricanes or […]

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NCCOS Aids West Coast Partners Responding to Extensive Harmful Algal Bloom

The National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) is providing $88,000 in emergency funds to aid Washington State to respond to an unprecedented West Coast harmful algal bloom (HAB) event. The funding supports collection and analysis of samples for the toxic algal bloom species Pseudo-nitzschia and domoic acid – the neurotoxin it produces – from beaches and offshore of […]

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NOAA, Partners Predict Severe Harmful Algal Bloom for Lake Erie

On July 9, NOAA and its research partners, using an ensemble modeling approach, predict that the 2015 western Lake Erie harmful algal bloom season will be among the most severe in recent years and could become the second most severe behind the record-setting 2011 bloom. The bloom will be expected to measure 8.7 on the severity […]

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Prestigious Toxins Conference Features NCCOS Science

The 2015 Mycotoxins & Phycotoxins Conference, held June 14-19, 2015 at Stonehill College, Easton, Maine highlighted the latest research on prevention and mitigation of harmful algal blooms by a number of NCCOS sponsored scientists. The 2015 conference program included scientists funded by NCCOS through the Prevention, Control, and Mitigation of Harmful Algal Blooms (PCMHAB) Program: […]

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