You are here: Home / News / Posts tagged "CCEHBR" (Page 4)

News and Features by Research Area or Topic

Marine Life in Gulf of Mexico Face Multiple Challenges

By Maggie Broadwater, Guest Blogger from NOAA’s Harmful Algal Bloom Analytical Response Team. Animals living in coastal waters can face a number of environmental stressors—both from nature and from humans—which, in turn, may have compounding effects. This may be the case for marine life in the Gulf of Mexico which experiences both oil spills and the […]

Continue reading

Texas Alerted to Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia Bloom in Galveston Bay

Volunteers with NOAA’s Phytoplankton Monitoring Network have reported a bloom of the diatom, Pseudo-nitzschia in Galveston Bay, Texas, and NOAA’s Analytical Response Team has confirmed that the bloom is producing domoic acid, a neurotoxin that can cause amnesiac shellfish poisoning. State managers of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas Department of State Health […]

Continue reading

NCCOS-developed Method for Toxins Detection Approved for Regulatory Testing of Shellfish in the U.S

Earlier this year, the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference (ISSC) approved a new assay developed by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) as an official method for identifying toxicity that could result in paralytic shellfish poisoning. This approval is the culmination of more than a decade of effort to find an alternative to live animal […]

Continue reading

Changes in Climate Could Make Pesticides More Toxic to Estuarine Organisms

During a recent climate webinar offered as part of the NOAA Science Day seminar series, NCCOS’s Marie DeLorenzo explained how changing climate variables may influence pesticide toxicity in the coastal zone. Pesticides enter estuarine waters via runoff and drift from agricultural, turf grass, home and garden, and mosquito control applications. DeLorenzo tested adult and larval […]

Continue reading

NCCOS Research Featured in EPA Webinar Series on Inland Harmful Algal Blooms

On Jan. 14, NCCOS researchers Steve Morton and Rick Stumpf were featured speakers at an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) webinar focused on inland harmful algal blooms. The event was part of an EPA webinar series intended to build awareness about the effects of nutrient pollution and harmful algal blooms on the environment. Dr. Morton provided […]

Continue reading

Sunscreen Chemical Threatens Coral Reefs

Researchers from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) and their partners have discovered that a sunscreen chemical commonly used in many soaps, cosmetics, and body fragrances is highly toxic to the larvae of the coral Stylophora pistillata. The team’s data show that even very low concentrations of benzophenone-2 (BP-2) can quickly kill juvenile […]

Continue reading

Common Brevetoxin Metabolite Found in Gulf of Mexico Oysters May Not be a Health Risk

Brevetoxin B2—an abundant shellfish metabolite of brevetoxin found in Gulf of Mexico oysters—does not readily pass through an intestinal barrier, rendering it unlikely to cause neurotoxic shellfish poisoning. The B2 metabolite is produced by oysters and many other animals by attaching the amino acid cysteine to the brevetoxin that is consumed by shellfish during blooms […]

Continue reading

NOAA Administrator Honors NCCOS Employees

At the 2013 NOAA Administrator and Technology Transfer Awards ceremony, Acting NOAA Administrator Dr. Kathryn Sullivan recognized four NCCOS employees for accomplishments that brought unusual credit to NOAA and the Department of Commerce. The following NCCOS employees received the Administrator’s Award: Kimberly Puglise, Felix Martinez, and Michael Dowgiallo for “leading foundational research and consensus building […]

Continue reading